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Forthcoming

Bigamy and Bloodshed

| Filed under: Forthcoming, True Crime, True Crime History
Bigamy & Bloodshed by Larry E. Wood. Kent State University Press

In the summer of 1885, ex-convict George Graham bigamously married Cora Lee, foster daughter of nationally known temperance revivalist Emma Molloy, and the three took up residence together on the Molloy farm near Springfield, Missouri. When the body of Graham’s first wife, Sarah, was found at the bottom of an abandoned well on the farm early the next year, Graham was charged with murder, and Cora and Emma were implicated as accessories. As Larry E. Wood notes, this sensational story made headlines across the country and threatened Mrs. Molloy’s career as a prominent evangelist and temperance revivalist.

 


A Woman Condemned

| Filed under: Forthcoming, True Crime, True Crime History
A Woman Condemned by James M. Greiner. Kent State University Press

At first glance, the 1932 Easter morning murder of Salvatore “Sam” Antonio had all the trademarks of a gang-related murder. Shot five times, stabbed a dozen more, Antonio was left for dead. His body was rolled into a culvert south of Albany, New York. It was only by chance that the mortally wounded Antonio was discovered and brought to the hospital. He died in the emergency room without ever naming his assailant.

 


Cleveland A to Z

and | Filed under: Black Squirrel Books, Forthcoming, History, Regional Interest
Cleveland A to Z by Grabowski and Pacini. Kent State University Press.

Cities around the globe, whether large or small, have characteristics that create a particular identity. So what about Cleveland? What are its nuances, its images? In addressing that question, <i>Cleveland A to Z </i>is not a typical city guide. Rather than concentrating solely on the usual topics—landmarks, restaurants, shopping, and notable facts—this guide touches on deeper themes related to Cleveland’s people, places, stories, and events. These 72 short articles reveal details about the city’s rich history, while also hinting at the issues, attitudes, and even the quirks that define Cleveland’s character. <i>Cleveland A to Z </i>truly serves as an entry point for a fuller exploration of the city’s history.

 


Blanton’s Browns

| Filed under: Black Squirrel Books, Forthcoming, Regional Interest, Sports
Blanton's Browns by Roger Gordon. Kent State University Press

Two very exciting games in Cleveland Browns history—their upset of the Baltimore Colts in 1964 and the Monday Night Football game on September 21, 1970, when they beat Joe Namath and the New York Jets—bookend this in-depth look at a highly successful era in the franchise’s history. During the five years from 1965–69, the Browns qualified for the postseason four times, played in three NFL championship games, and twice came within a game of the Super Bowl.

 


Moments of Truth

| Filed under: Forthcoming, May 4 Resources, Photography, U.S. History
Moments of Truth by Howard Ruffner. Kent State University Press

Here, in Moments of Truth: A Photo­grapher’s Experience of Kent State 1970, Ruffner not only reproduces a collection of nearly 150 of his photographs—many never before published—but also offers a stirring narrative in which he revisits his work and attempts to further examine these events and his own experience of them. It is, indeed, an intensely personal journey that he invites us to share.

 


The Many Names for Mother

| Filed under: Forthcoming, Poetry, Wick First Book
The Many Names for Mother/Julia Kolchinsky Dasbach. Kent State University Press

The Many Names for Mother is an exploration of intergenerational motherhood; its poems reach toward the future even as they reflect on the past. This evocative collection hovers around history, trauma, and absence—from ancestral histories of anti-Semitic discrimination in the former Soviet Union to the poet’s travels, while pregnant with her son, to death camp sites in Poland. As a descendant of Holocaust survivors, Dasbach ponders how the weight of her Jewish-refugee immigrant experience comes to influence her raising of a first-generation, bilingual, and multiethnic American child.

 


Reading Hemingway’s A Farewell to Arms

and | Filed under: Forthcoming, Hemingway Studies, Literature & Literary Criticism, Reading Hemingway
Reading Hemingway's A Farewell to Arms by Lewis and Roos. Kent State University Press

In this comprehensive guide, Lewis and Roos reveal how A Farewell to Arms represents a complex alchemy of Hemingway’s personal experience as a Red Cross ambulance driver in 1918, his extensive historical research of a time period and terrain with which he was personally unfamiliar, and the impact of his vast reading in the great works of 19th-century fiction. Ultimately, Lewis and Roos assert, Hemingway’s great novel is not simply a story of love and war, as most have concluded, but an intricate novel of ideas exploring the clash of reason and faith and deep questions of epistemology.

 


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