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New Studies in U.S. Foreign Relations

Inactive.
The Press is no longer accepting proposals for this series.
This series focuses on works that expand the parameters of U.S. foreign relations. Chronologically broad and topically diverse, it is designed to further the internationalization—indeed, globalization—of the field by publishing a wide variety of innovative books, including interdisciplinary studies, that place the United States within a larger, transnational context. Areas of focus include, but are not limited to, identity formation and projection, borderlands studies, comparative history, and cultural transfer.

Uruguay and the United States, 1903–1929

| Filed under: New Studies in U.S. Foreign Relations
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Despite its fascinating history, the attention paid by North American historians to Uruguay, a nation nestled in the corner of South America between Argentina and Brazil, is scant when compared to that shown to its neighbors. A major portion of the Uruguayan story revolves around…

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Safe for Decolonization

| Filed under: Diplomatic Studies, New Studies in U.S. Foreign Relations, U.S. Foreign Relations
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In the first decade after World War II, Singapore underwent radical political and socioeconomic changes with the progressive retreat of Great Britain from its Southeast Asian colonial empire. The United States, under the Eisenhower administration, sought to fill the vacuum left by the British retreat…

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Seeing Drugs

| Filed under: Diplomatic Studies, New Studies in U.S. Foreign Relations, U.S. Foreign Relations
Weimer-small

Through interdisciplinary and comparative analysis, Seeing Drugs examines the contours of the burgeoning drug war, the cultural significance of drugs and addiction, and their links to the formation of national identity within the United States, Thailand, Burma, and Mexico. By highlighting the prevalence of modernization…

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Arguing Americanism

| Filed under: Diplomatic Studies, History, New Studies in U.S. Foreign Relations
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Since World War II, American historians have traditionally sided with the Loyalist supporters, validating their arguments that the pro-Nationalists were un-American for backing an unpalatable dictator. In Arguing Americanism, author Michael E. Chapman examines the long-overlooked pro-Nationalist argument. Employing new archival sources, Chapman documents a…

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The Birth of Development

| Filed under: Diplomatic Studies, New Studies in U.S. Foreign Relations, U.S. Foreign Relations
Staples Book Cover

Grounded in archival research conducted in the archives of the World Bank, Food and Agriculture Organization, and World Health Organization, as well as in other archives in the United States, Canada, and Great Britain, The Birth of Development provides a foundational understanding for many of…

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Caution and Cooperation

| Filed under: Diplomatic Studies, New Studies in U.S. Foreign Relations
Caution Book Cover

Using a wide array of primary materials from both sides of the Atlantic, Myers traces the sources of potential Anglo-American wartime turmoil as well as the various reasons both sides had for avoiding war. And while he does note the disagreement between Washington and London,…

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The Will to Believe

| Filed under: New Studies in U.S. Foreign Relations, U.S. Foreign Relations
Kennedy Book Cover

In many ways, Woodrow Wilson and the era of World War I cast a deeper shadow over contemporary foreign policy debates than more recent events, such as the Cold War. More so than after World War II, Wilson and his contemporaries engaged in a wide-ranging…

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