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New Studies in U.S. Foreign Relations

Inactive.
The Press is no longer accepting proposals for this series.
This series focuses on works that expand the parameters of U.S. foreign relations. Chronologically broad and topically diverse, it is designed to further the internationalization—indeed, globalization—of the field by publishing a wide variety of innovative books, including interdisciplinary studies, that place the United States within a larger, transnational context. Areas of focus include, but are not limited to, identity formation and projection, borderlands studies, comparative history, and cultural transfer.

Addressing America

| Filed under: American History, New Studies in U.S. Foreign Relations, U.S. Foreign Relations
Malanson Cover

In his presidential Farewell Address of 1796, George Washington presented a series of maxims to guide the construction of a wise foreign policy. He believed, as did generations of his adherents, that if the United States stayed true to the principles he discussed, the country would eventually attain national greatness and international respectability. These principles quickly became engrained in the DNA of what it meant to be an American in the first half of the nineteenth century, shaping the formation of U.S. foreign policy, politics, and political culture. The Declaration of Independence affirmed American ideals, the Constitution established American government, and the Farewell Address enabled Americans to understand their country and its place in the world. While the Declaration and Constitution have persisted as foundational documents, our appreciation for the Farewell Address has faded with time.

 


Dissolving Tensions

| Filed under: American History, New Studies in U.S. Foreign Relations, U.S. Foreign Relations
Myers Cover

Dissolving Tensions dismisses the long-held argument that a British-American rapprochement did not occur until the mid-1890s. Instead, author Phillip E. Myers shows that the rapprochement was distinct prior to the Civil War, became more distinctive during the conflict, and continued to take shape afterward. 

 


Informal Ambassadors

| Filed under: Explore Women's History, New Studies in U.S. Foreign Relations
cooper cover

From 1865 to 1945, a number of prominent marriages united American heiresses and members of the British aristocracy. In Informal Ambassadors, author Dana Cooper examines the lives and marriages of the American-born, British-wed Lady Jennie Jerome Churchill, Mary Endicott Chamberlain, Vicereine Mary Leiter Curzon, Duchess Consuelo Vanderbilt Balsan, and Lady Nancy Astor. This cohort of women surprised their families—both British and American—by exhibiting an extraordinary degree of agency in a period that placed women solidly outside the boundaries of politics and diplomacy.

 


Greek-American Relations from Monroe to Truman

| Filed under: Diplomatic Studies, New Studies in U.S. Foreign Relations
Repousis_web

Repousis chronicles American public attitudes and government policies toward modern Greece from its war for independence (1821–1829) to the Truman Doctrine (1947) when Washington intervened to keep Greece from coming under communist domination.

 


Buried in the Sands of the Ogaden

| Filed under: Diplomatic Studies, New Studies in U.S. Foreign Relations
Woodroofe-hr

When the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT) between the Soviet Union and United States faltered during the administration of Jimmy Carter, National Security Advisor Zbigniew Brzezinski claimed that “SALT lies buried in the sands of the Ogaden.” How did superpower détente survive Vietnam but stumble in the Horn of Africa?

 


NATO before the Korean War

| Filed under: Diplomatic Studies, New Studies in U.S. Foreign Relations, Political Science & Politics, U.S. Foreign Relations
Kaplan_web

Conventional wisdom has the Korean War putting the “O” in NATO. Prior to that time, from the signing of the North Atlantic Treaty on April 4, 1949, to the North Korean invasion of South Korea on June 25, 1950, the Treaty allies were just going through the motions of establishing an organization. Historian Lawrence Kaplan argues that this is a mistaken view, and he fills significant blanks in the record of 1949 and 1950, which NATO officials and analysts alike have largely ignored.

 


NATO after Sixty Years

and | Filed under: New Studies in U.S. Foreign Relations
Sperling-hr

NATO after Sixty Years addresses the challenges of adaptation confronting the North Atlantic Treaty Organization in the early twenty-first century. Comprised of essays from a range of experts, each chapter examines an aspect of NATO’s difficult adjustment to the post–Cold War security challenges within and without its treaty-based responsibilities and competencies.