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The Brilliance of Charles Whittlesey

| Filed under: Civil War Era, Environmental Studies, Forthcoming, Regional Interest
Charles Whittlesey cover

The Brilliance of Charles Whittlesey offers the first full-length biography of one of the most outstanding and influential Americans of the 19th century, Charles Whittlesey (1808–1886). Whittlesey advanced numerous fields, including geology, exploration, history, archaeology, and military strategy. Much of his work, however, has been treated as a mere footnote of American history and largely neglected by historians.

 


Yours Affectionately, Osgood

and | Filed under: American History, Civil War Era, Forthcoming, Interpreting the Civil War: Texts and Contexts, U.S. History
Burrows Cover

More than 3 million men served in the American Civil War. In Yours Affectionately, Osgood, editors Sarah Tracy Burrows and Ryan W. Keating have assembled a collection of letters from one of those soldiers—Osgood Vose Tracy of the 122nd New York Infantry. Sarah Tracy Burrows, a descendant of Colonel Tracy, has compiled this expansive collection from her family’s private papers. Paired with illuminating discussion and context from noted historian Ryan W. Keating, Tracy’s letters home follow his journey as a soldier and prisoner of war from his enlistment in September 1862 through the end of the war in May 1865, as Tracy then readjusted to civilian life.

 


Slavery

and | Filed under: Civil War Era, History, Interpreting American History, Recent Releases
Slavery: Interpreting American History. Kent State University Press

To fully understand the various ways in which slavery has been depicted and described is a difficult task. Like any other important historical issue, this requires a thorough grasp of the underlying history, methodological developments over time, and the contemporary politics and culture of historians’ own times. And the case of slavery is further complicated, of course, by changes in the legal and political status of African Americans in the 20th and 21st centuries.

 


A Notable Bully

| Filed under: Civil War Era, History, Interpreting the Civil War: Texts and Contexts, Recent Releases, Understanding Civil War History
A Notable Bully/Cray. Kent State University Press

Largely forgotten by historians, Billy Wilson (1822–1874) was a giant in his time, a man well known throughout New York City, a man shaped by the city’s immigrant culture, its harsh voting practices, and its efforts to participate in the War for the Union. For decades, Wilson’s name made headlines—for many different reasons—in the city’s major newspapers.

 


No Place for Glory

| Filed under: Civil War Era, Civil War Soldiers and Strategies, Recent Releases, Understanding Civil War History
No Place for Glory/Wynstra. Kent State University Press

Over the years, many top historians have cited Major General Robert E. Rodes as the best division commander in Robert E. Lee’s vaunted army. Despite those accolades, Rodes faltered badly at Gettysburg, which stands as the only major blemish on his otherwise sterling record.

 


My Dear Nelly

| Filed under: Civil War Era, Interpreting the Civil War: Texts and Contexts, Recent Releases
My Dear Nelly edited by Paul Taylor. Kent State University Press

More than 150 years after the end of the Civil War, West Point engineer and Brevet Brigadier General Orlando M. Poe (1832–1895) remains one of the Union’s most unsung heroes. He served the Union in uniform from day one of the conflict until the Confederate surrender in North Carolina in late April 1865, and he used his unparalleled ability to predict Confederate movements to lead multiple successful campaigns that turned the tide of the war. Accordingly, the roar of battle permeates this collection of 241 highly literate and previously unpublished wartime letters to his wife, Eleanor Brent Poe.

 


Catholic Confederates

| Filed under: Civil War Era, Recent Releases, The Civil War Era in the South, U.S. History
Catholic Confederates by Gracjan Kraszewski. Kent State University Press

For the majority of Southern Catholics, religion and politics were not a point of tension. Devout Catholics were also devoted Confederates, including nuns who served as nurses; their deep involvement in the Confederate cause as medics confirms the all-encompassing nature of Catholic involvement in the Confederacy, a fact greatly underplayed by scholars of Civil War religion and American Catholicism. Kraszewski argues against an “Americanization” of Catholics in the South and instead coins the term “Confederatization” to describe the process by which Catholics made themselves virtually indistinguishable from their Protestant neighbors.

 


War, Memory, and the 1913 Gettysburg Reunion

| Filed under: Civil War Era, Military History, Recent Releases, U.S. History
War, Memory and the 1913 Gettysburg Reunion by Thomas R. Flagel. Kent State University Press

This June 29–July 4 reunion drew over 55,000 official attendees plus thousands more who descended upon a town of 4,000 during the scorching summer of 1913, with the promise of little more than a cot and two blankets, military fare, and the presence of countless adversaries from a horrific war. Most were revisiting a time and place in their personal history that involved acute physical and emotional trauma.

 


Blue-Blooded Cavalryman 

| Filed under: Civil War Era, Civil War Soldiers and Strategies, Military History, Recent Releases, U.S. History
Blue-Blooded Cavalryman by J. Gregory Acken. Kent State University Press

In May 1863, eighteen-year-old William Brooke Rawle graduated from the University of Pennsylvania and traded a genteel, cultured life of privilege for service as a cavalry officer. Traveling from his home in Philadelphia to Virginia, he joined the Third Pennsylvania Cavalry and soon found himself in command of a company of veterans of two years’ service, some of whom were more than twice his age. Within eight weeks, he had participated in two of the largest cavalry battles of the war at Brandy Station and Gettysburg.

 


James Riley Weaver’s Civil War

, , and | Filed under: Civil War Era, Civil War Soldiers and Strategies, Military History, Recent Releases, U.S. History
James Riley Weaver's Civil War by Schlotterbeck, Wilson, Kawaue, and Klingensmith. Kent State University Press.

Captured on October 11, 1863, James Riley Weaver, a Union cavalry officer, spent nearly seventeen months in Confederate prisons. Remarkably, Weaver kept a diary that documents 666 consecutive days of his experience, including his cavalry duties, life in a series of prisons throughout the South, and his return to civilian life. It is an unparalleled eyewitness account of a crucial part of our history.

 


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