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Through Blood and Fire

| Filed under: Civil War Era, Forthcoming, History, Interpreting the Civil War: Texts and Contexts, U.S. History
Through Blood and Fire by J. Gregory Acken. KSUPress

Charles J. Mills, the scion of a wealthy, prominent Boston family, experienced a privileged upbringing and was educated at Harvard University. When the Civil War began, Mills, like many of his college classmates, sought to secure a commission in the army. After a year of unsuccessful attempts, Mills was appointed second lieutenant in the Second Massachusetts Infantry in August 1862; however, he was seriously wounded at Antietam a month later. Following a nearly yearlong recovery, Mills eventually reentered the service as a staff officer, although he remained physically disabled for the rest of his life. He was initially with the Ninth Corps during the Overland and Petersburg Campaigns and later at the Second Corps headquarters.

 


Dressing à la Turque

| Filed under: Costume Society of America, Fashion History, Forthcoming
Dressing a la Turque. Van Cleave.

While French fashion has historically set the bar across the Western world, the cultural influences that inspired it are often obscured. Dressing à la Turque examines the theatrical depictions of Ottoman costumes, or Turkish dress, and demonstrates the French fascination for this foreign culture and its clothing. The impact, however, went far beyond costumes worn for art and theater, as Ottoman-inspired fashions became the most prominent and popular themes in French women’s fashion throughout the 18th century.

 


From My Experience

| Filed under: Forthcoming, Nature, Regional Interest
From my Experience/Louis Bromfield. KSUPress

A sequel of sorts to his earlier book, Pleasant Valley, this book significantly adds to Louis Bromfield’s body of work on agriculture, economics, and the value of home.

“Because Bromfield has seen so many different lands, he is now more a country man than ever. When he turned his first spadeful on his new Ohio farm acres, it marked the return of the native. Bromfield writes his books in pencil, longhand. He has such concentration that he can come in from working in his fields, go to his desk and finish a sentence he started the day before.”

The New Yorker

 


Pleasant Valley

| Filed under: Forthcoming, Nature, Regional Interest
Pleasant Valley/Louis Bromfield. KSUPress.

“Written years before celebrated authors like Wendell Berry and Barbara Kingsolver popularized agriculture writing, Pleasant Valley . . . unveils the romantic qualities of farm labor, without romanticizing it. It celebrates hard work, without being patronizing. It makes you want to get dirt under your nails. Pleasant Valley is charmingly nostalgic, yet offers environmental commentary that is timely and urgent. Bromfield’s writing will appeal to lovers of regional writing, unconventional memoirs, and mid-century modernity in literature. Most of all, it is a book to read when you miss home, whatever and wherever that may be.”

Public Books

 


The Fifth Star

| Filed under: Forthcoming, Regional Interest, U.S. History, Women’s Studies
The Fifth Starr-Jamie Capuzza.

As battles over voting rights continue to be a major issue throughout the United States, Jamie Capuzza looks back at the story of Ohio—the fifth state to ratify the Nineteenth Amendment— and its key role in the national women’s suffrage movement. From 1850 through 1920, Ohio’s contributions were significant: Ohioans were the first to petition a government for women’s enfranchisement, they formed the nation’s first state-level women’s rights organization, and Ohio hosted two of the earliest national women’s rights conventions.

 

 


The Governor’s Pawns

| Filed under: Civil War Era, Forthcoming, Interpreting the Civil War: Texts and Contexts
The Governor's Pawns/Randall S. Gooden. KSUPress

While the taking of hostages by both the Union and the Confederacy was common during the Civil War, it was unique for an individual state government to engage in this practice. The Governor’s Pawns highlights the implementation of a hostage law established by Virginia’s pro-Union government in 1863 and the adoption of that law by the newly formed state of West Virginia. Author Randall Gooden uses genealogical sources to emphasize the personal nature of civilian arrests and hostage-taking and describes the impact on the communities and individuals left scarred by this practice. Readers are taken into the state and national capitol buildings, army camps, jails and military prisons, hospitals, and graveyards that accompanied the tit-for-tat style of pointedly personal warfare.

 


Black Hair in a White World

| Filed under: African American Studies, Costume Society of America, Fashion History, Forthcoming
Black Hair in a White World by Tameka N. Ellington. KSUPress

Black Hair in a White World is a groundbreaking, serious study of the cultural history, perceptions, and increasing acceptance of Black hair in broader American society. Editor Tameka N. Ellington brings together a varied group of scholars who together make an important contribution to ongoing discussions about race, gender, sociology, and self-expression.

 


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