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Inkling, Historian, Soldier, and Brother

| Filed under: Forthcoming, French History, Military Service, Tolkien, Lewis, and Inkling Studies
Inkling, Historian, Soldier, and Brother cover

Detailing the life of Warren Hamilton Lewis, author Don W. King gives us new insights into the life and mind of Warren’s famous brother, C. S. Lewis, and also demonstrates how Warren’s experiences provide an illuminating window into the events, personalities, and culture of 20th-century England. Inkling, Historian, Soldier, and Brother will appeal to those interested in C. S. Lewis and British social and cultural history.

 


The Lion’s Country

| Filed under: Forthcoming, Literature & Literary Criticism, Religion, Tolkien, Lewis, and Inkling Studies
"the Lion's Country" cover image

Drawing on C. S. Lewis’s essays, sermons, and fiction, The Lion’s Country offers a comprehensive exploration of Lewis’s understanding of reality—important, Charlie W. Starr argues, to more fully understand Lewis’s writing but also to challenge and inform our own thought about what constitutes the Real.

 


Letters to Lizzie

| Filed under: Civil War Era, Forthcoming, History, Interpreting the Civil War: Texts and Contexts, U.S. History
Letters to Lizzie cover

Letters to Lizzie: The Story of Sixteen Men in the Civil War and the One Woman Who Connected Them All contains a collection of letters exchanged between 16 men—15 soldiers and a quartermaster at a military hospital—and one young woman, Lizzie Brick. Since Lizzie herself could not bear arms, she took up her pen and through ongoing correspondence helped these Union soldiers sustain their motivation for the cause.

 


No Place for a Woman

| Filed under: American History, Civil War Era, Forthcoming, History, Interpreting the Civil War: Texts and Contexts
No Place for a Woman by Mike Pride. Cover.

Historian Mike Pride traces Harriet Dame’s service as a field nurse with a storied New Hampshire infantry regiment during the Peninsula campaign, Second Bull Run, Gettysburg, and Cold Harbor. Twice during that service, Dame was briefly captured. In early 1863, she spent months running a busy enterprise in Washington, DC, that connected families at home to soldiers in the field.

 


In the Heart of it All

| Filed under: Autobiography & Memoirs, Biography, Forthcoming, Political Science & Politics
In the Heart of it All by Richard Celeste.

“Dick, remember this admonition: to whom much is given, much is expected.” As the eldest child in his Italian American family, Richard F. Celeste frequently heard his maternal grandmother repeat this aphorism. His paternal grandmother’s advice was, “Bresta your cards.” This divergent advice reverberated within him for years to come, informing Celeste’s approach to what has become a life of serving others.

 


The Brilliance of Charles Whittlesey

| Filed under: Civil War Era, Environmental Studies, Forthcoming, Regional Interest
Charles Whittlesey cover

The Brilliance of Charles Whittlesey offers the first full-length biography of one of the most outstanding and influential Americans of the 19th century, Charles Whittlesey (1808–1886). Whittlesey advanced numerous fields, including geology, exploration, history, archaeology, and military strategy. Much of his work, however, has been treated as a mere footnote of American history and largely neglected by historians.

 


Yours Affectionately, Osgood

and | Filed under: American History, Civil War Era, Forthcoming, Interpreting the Civil War: Texts and Contexts, U.S. History
Burrows Cover

More than 3 million men served in the American Civil War. In Yours Affectionately, Osgood, editors Sarah Tracy Burrows and Ryan W. Keating have assembled a collection of letters from one of those soldiers—Osgood Vose Tracy of the 122nd New York Infantry. Sarah Tracy Burrows, a descendant of Colonel Tracy, has compiled this expansive collection from her family’s private papers. Paired with illuminating discussion and context from noted historian Ryan W. Keating, Tracy’s letters home follow his journey as a soldier and prisoner of war from his enlistment in September 1862 through the end of the war in May 1865, as Tracy then readjusted to civilian life.

 


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