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The Complete Funky Winkerbean

| Filed under: Art, Black Squirrel Books, Comics, Forthcoming

Funky Winkerbean, a newspaper staple since 1972, is one of the few comic strips that allows its characters to grow and age. As time passes and characters evolve, new and loyal readers alike are reminded that not only does Funky have a future, but the strip has a rich past. What remains a constant is Batiuk’s signature narrative-driven humor. This tenth volume, spanning from 1999 through 2001, embraces the strip’s past while casting an eye to a bright future.

 


Reading Hemingway’s Winner Take Nothing

and | Filed under: Forthcoming, Hemingway Studies, Literature & Literary Criticism, Reading Hemingway
Reading Hemingway's Winner Take Nothing cover

Through line-by-line annotations and accompanying commentary, this book weaves together the biographical, historical, and cultural threads of one of Hemingway’s more overlooked works, thus providing much needed guidance for Hemingway scholars and general readers alike.

 


The Shared Witness of C. S. Lewis and Austin Farrer

| Filed under: Forthcoming, Literature & Literary Criticism
The Shared Witness of C. S. Lewis and Austin Farrer cover

The Shared Witness of C. S. Lewis and Austin Farrer explores a number of areas that demonstrate the ways in which Lewis and Farrer both intersected and influenced each other’s thought. Both insisted that myth prepared the heart for a sense of divine glory and even had a place in the Christian scriptures.

 


Slavery

and | Filed under: Forthcoming, History, Interpreting American History
Slavery: Interpreting American History. Kent State University Press

To fully understand the various ways in which slavery has been depicted and described is a difficult task. Like any other important historical issue, this requires a thorough grasp of the underlying history, methodological developments over time, and the contemporary politics and culture of historians’ own times. And the case of slavery is further complicated, of course, by changes in the legal and political status of African Americans in the 20th and 21st centuries.

 


A Notable Bully

| Filed under: Forthcoming, History, Interpreting the Civil War: Texts and Contexts, Understanding Civil War History
A Notable Bully/Cray. Kent State University Press

Largely forgotten by historians, Billy Wilson (1822–1874) was a giant in his time, a man well known throughout New York City, a man shaped by the city’s immigrant culture, its harsh voting practices, and its efforts to participate in the War for the Union. For decades, Wilson’s name made headlines—for many different reasons—in the city’s major newspapers.

 


No Place for Glory

| Filed under: Civil War Era, Civil War Soldiers and Strategies, Forthcoming, Understanding Civil War History
No Place for Glory/Wynstra. Kent State University Press

Over the years, many top historians have cited Major General Robert E. Rodes as the best division commander in Robert E. Lee’s vaunted army. Despite those accolades, Rodes faltered badly at Gettysburg, which stands as the only major blemish on his otherwise sterling record.

 


Cold War Secrets

| Filed under: Forthcoming, True Crime, True Crime History
Cold War Secrets/Welsome. Kent State University Press

Thomas Riha vanished on March 15, 1969, sparking a mystery that lives on 50 years later. A native of Prague, Czechoslovakia, Riha was a popular teacher at the University of Colorado at Boulder and a handsome man, with thick, graying hair and a wry smile.

After his disappearance, the FBI and the CIA told local law enforcement and university officials that Riha was alive and well and had left Boulder to get away from his wife. But, as Eileen Welsome convincingly argues, Riha was not alive and well at all. A woman named Galya Tannenbaum, she concludes, had murdered him.

 


Uncommon Case of Daniel Brown

| Filed under: Forthcoming, True Crime, True Crime History

In 1875, an Irish-born Baltimore policeman, Patrick McDonald, entered the home of Daniel Brown, an African American laborer, and clubbed and shot Brown, who died within an hour of the attack. In similar cases at the time, authorities routinely exonerated Maryland law enforcement officers who killed African Americans, usually without serious inquiries into the underlying facts. But in this case, Baltimore’s white community chose a different path. A coroner’s jury declined to attribute the killing to an accident or self-defense, the state’s attorney indicted McDonald and brought him to trial, and a criminal court jury convicted McDonald of manslaughter.

 


The Giants and Their City

| Filed under: Forthcoming
The Giants and Their City by Lincoln A. Mitchell. Kent State University Press

The San Francisco Giants have been one of the most successful franchises in baseball in the 21st century, as evidenced by the three World Series championship flags flying in the breeze over Oracle Park—one of the most beautiful baseball venues in the world. However, the team was not always so successful on or off the field. The Giants and Their City tells the story of a Giants franchise that had no recognizable stars, was last in the league in attendance, and had more than one foot out the door on the way to Toronto when a local businessman and a brand-new mayor found a way to keep the team in San Francisco.

 


Translation and Time

| Filed under: Forthcoming, Translation Studies
Translation and Time by James St. André. Kent State University Press

This volume brings together 12 essays on the relation between temporality and translation, engaging in both theoretical reflection and consideration of concrete case studies. The essays can be read independently, but three major themes run through them and facilitate a discussion about the many ways in which the theoretical and practical consideration of temporality may provide new insights and research directions for translation studies.

 


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