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Titles

The ’63 Steelers

| Filed under: eBook Sale 20, Sports, Writing Sports
The '63 Steelers cover image

Author Rudy Dicks recreates the Steelers’ 1963 season game by game and profiles the ragtag squad of rejects, misfits, and scalawags that coach Buddy Parker jury-rigged into a contender. He shows how a group of unsung players banded together to overcome tough breaks, injuries, and a losing tradition, challenging the more glamorous Cleveland Browns and New York Giants for a conference title and a berth in the NFL Championship Game.

 


“A Punishment on the Nation”

| Filed under: Civil War Era, Civil War in the North
Miller cover image

Private Silas W. Haven, a native New Englander transplanted to Iowa, enlisted in 1862 to fight in a war that he believed was God’s punishment for the sin of slavery. Only through the war’s purifying bloodshed, thought Haven, could the nation be redeemed and the Union saved. Marching off to war with the 27th Iowa Volunteer Infantry, Haven left behind his wife Jane and their three young children. Over the course of four years, he wrote her nearly two hundred letters, collected here for the first time.

 


“Behind Bayonets”

and | Filed under: Civil War Era
Van Tassel Book Cover

Eminent Cleveland historian David Van Tassel had undertaken the challenge of writing an illustrated history of the Cleveland homefront during the Civil War. Unfortunately, he died in 2000 before completing his manuscript. Historian John Vacha completed the final chapters using notes, lists, and ideas that Van Tassel had gathered, and their efforts are presented in Behind Bayonets.

 


“Circumstances are Destiny”

| Filed under: Civil War in the North, Explore Women's History, History
Brakebill Book Cover

Author Tina Stewart Brakebill has woven original research with secondary material to form the fabric of Colby’s life—from her days as the daughter of an Ohio dairy farmer to her relationship with her daughter, a pioneering university professor. What emerges is a multifaceted picture of one woman’s lifelong struggle to establish her own identity within the confines of society’s proscriptions. Colby’s life story offers valuable insights that move beyond conventional generalizations regarding women of the past and that continue to affect the study of women today.

 


“Feel the Bonds That Draw”

| Filed under: Civil War Era, Photography, Understanding Civil War History
Dee cover image

“Feel the Bonds That Draw” presents nearly 200 images from the extensive Civil War photographic collections of Cleveland’s Western Reserve Historical Society, complementing author Christine Dee’s reflections on topics such as historical memory, the war as economic engine, and the impact of mobilization and combat on civilians and the environment. “Feel the Bonds That Draw” is a fine addition to the library of anyone interested in the history of America’s cruelest conflict.

 


“Gentleman George” Hunt Pendleton

| Filed under: Biography
Mach Book Cover

“Gentleman George” not only provides a microcosm of Democratic Party operations during Pendleton’s lifetime but is also a case study in the longevity of Jacksonian principles. In an era of intense Democratic factionalism stretching from the 1850s to the 1880s, Pendleton sought to unite the divided party around its traditional Jacksonian principles, which, when reapplied to address the changing political issues, became the foundation of the midwestern Democratic ideology.

 


“My Greatest Quarrel with Fortune”

| Filed under: Civil War Era, Civil War Soldiers and Strategies, Military History, Understanding Civil War History
Beemer cover Image

Lew Wallace of Indiana was a self-taught extraordinary military talent. With boldness and celerity, he advanced in less than a year from the rank of colonel of the 11th Indiana to that of major general commanding the 3rd Division at Shiloh. Ultimately, his civilian, amateur military status collided headlong with the professional military culture being assiduously cultivated by Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck, a cautious and difficult commander. The fallout was aggravated by Wallace’s unwillingness to acknowledge the protocols that sustained the military chain of command. The primary result of the collision was that he failed to realize his most cherished ambition: leading men in battle.

 


“No Disgrace to My Country”

| Filed under: American History, Biography, Civil War Era
Tidball Book Cover

This exhaustive study chronicles the life of career army officer John C. Tidball, from action in major Civil War battles to postwar service in the West. Beginning with the first Battle of Bull Run, Tidball, saw action in nearly all the major engagements in the Eastern Theater, including Chancellorsville, Yorktown, Williamsburg, Gettysburg, Antietam, and Petersburg. Using previously unpublished wartime letters and memoirs, Eugene C. Tidball captivates the reader with the story of his most famous relative’s years in service to his country. Tidball’s account extends beyond the Civil War, to include recounting his presence at the Supreme Court’s delivery of the Dred Scott decision; his commanding of the military District of Alaska; his traversing the Southwest in 1853 as a member of the 35th Parallel Pacific Railway Survey; and his service as aide-de-camp to General-in-Chief William Tecumseh Sherman.

 


“No Sorrow Like Our Sorrow”

| Filed under: Civil War Era
Chesebrough Book Cover

Sermons as historical documents reflect the thoughts, emotions, values, prejudices, and beliefs of their time. “The more popular a preacher, the more likely it is that she or he mirrors the hopes and fears of a significant number of people,” explains David B. Chesebrough in “No Sorrow like Our Sorrow.” His analysis of more than 300 sermons delivered in a seven-week period following Lincoln’s assassination (April 16-June 1, 1865) examines the influence of religious leaders on public opinion and policy during that turbulent period.

 


“Silk and Bamboo” Music in Shanghai

| Filed under: Music, World Musics
Witzleben Book Cover

“Of all the world’s major musical cultures, that of China may well be the least thoroughly understood and most often misunderstood by Western scholars and music lovers,” writes J. Lawrence Witzleben. Witzleben adds to the understanding of this musical culture with the first book-length study of one of China’s most influential regional musical traditions. The first Western ethnomusicologist admitted to a Chinese conservatory, Witzleben presents a multifaceted study, based on more than two years of fieldwork in the early 1900s, of “silk and bamboo” string and wind music (Jiangnan sizhu) in Shanghai. Although Jiangnan sizhu is a regional tradition, enjoyed by only a small part of the population, an indepth look at it reveals much about Chinese musical culture. Through his varied experiences as student, performer, and participant-observer, Witzleben is able to present and discuss the perspectives of musicians in Shanghai and of Chinese scholars and teachers, as well as those of a Western-trained ethnomusicologist. The result is a comprehensive understanding of Jiangnan sizhu its musical sounds and concepts; the people who play, teach, and learn the music; and the environment in which it is and has been played, heard, and discussed.

 


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