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Titles

I Left My Wings on a Chair

| Filed under: Poetry, Wick Chapbook
Schubert cover

“When the wire man in love with the boiled wool woman imagines himself making love with her under the emerald tree and then making her a mouth, is he desiring to make for her a mouth, or to make of her a mouth? Such questions charge Karen Schubert’s off-kilter worlds with a force less like gravity than like Brownian movement: the poems in I Left My Wings on a Chair don’t orbit, they careen.”—H. L. Hix

“Karen Schubert’s latest collection, I Left My Wings on a Chair, reminds me why I love prose poetry. These are beautiful prose poems; each one is a gem; each one is sublime, witty, and surprising. It’s as if she has taken the world that we see and experience every day and given it back again, refreshed, alive, and shimmering. Reading her poems reminds me of reading William Stafford and Naomi Shihab Nye, poets who let you see the mystical and the absurd in the everyday, who make you feel a little better about being alive.” —Nin Andrews

 


I’ve Seen the Elephant

| Filed under: Regional Interest
Saxbe Book Cover

In this lively memoir, William B. Saxbe narrates his life’s journey from his youth in a small Ohio town to his military career during World War II and Korea and through his career as a public servant in Ohio, in Washington, D.C., and overseas. He regales readers with stories about hopping a freight train when he was in the sixth grade, insights on being elected to the United States Senate, commentary on serving as Nixon’s attorney general at the height of the Watergate scandal, and descriptions of life as the U.S. ambassador to India.

 


Ida McKinley

| Filed under: Biography, History
Anthony cover

This is the first full-length biography of Ida Saxton McKinley (1847– 1907), the wife of William McKinley, president of the United States from 1897 to his assassination in 1901. Long demeaned by history because she suffered from epilepsy—which the society of her era mistakenly believed to border on mental illness—Ida McKinley was an exceptional woman who exerted a strong influence on her husband’s political decisions.

 


Images of the Rust Belt

| Filed under: Photography
Images Book Cover

Over the last 150 years, steel production played a vital role in the shaping of our nation. This was especially true in Youngstown, Ohio, a part of what is now often referred to as “the Rust Belt.” In their prime, however, the Youngstown mills ran along 25 miles of the Mahoning River and employed tens of thousands of people. All of that changed in September 1977 when the LTV Corporation announced that it was closing its Youngstown Works. Youngstown today struggles for its survival.

 


The Imperfect Revolution

| Filed under: American Abolitionism and Antislavery, Discover Black History, History
Barker Book Cover

On June 2, 1854, crowds lined the streets of Boston, hissing and shouting at federal authorities as they escorted the fugitive slave Anthony Burns to the ship that would return him to his slaveholders in Virginia. Days earlier, handbills had littered the streets decrying Burns’s arrest, and abolitionists, intent on freeing Burns, had attacked with a battering ram the courthouse in which he was detained, leaving one dead, several wounded, and thirteen in custody. In the end it would take federal officials nearly 2,000 troops and $40,000 to send Burns back to Virginia. No fugitive slave would be captured in Boston again.

 


In Darkness with God

| Filed under: Biography, Discover Black History
Gomez_Jefferson1-mr

Gomez-Jefferson captures the growing concern of the Black middle-class with civil rights and its persistent attempts to confront problems with tactics less confrontational than those of the sixties and seventies. More than a biography, In Darkness with God is a history of Black life during the early part of the century and a chronicle of the political and religious struggles of the first autonomous Black church in the United States.

 


In the Arbor

| Filed under: Poetry, Wick Chapbook
Kuhl Book Cover

“The movement at the center of so many of these poems is that of air, fire, water, nigh—of what cannot be seen, even as the speaker moves ever inward to face her own dreams, her demons and her desires. The strong central poem, ‘After the Rape,’ defines the moment from which the poet must measure the world. That she finds in the memory of a dolphin rising into air is the magic of Nancy Kuhl’s collection.” –Judith Kitchen

 


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