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A Sense of Tales Untold

| Filed under: Literature & Literary Criticism, Recent Releases, Tolkien, Lewis, and Inkling Studies
A Sense of Tales Untold by Peter Grybauskas. Cover.

A Sense of Tales Untold examines the margins of J. R. R. Tolkien’s work: the frames, edges, allusions, and borders between story and un-story and the spaces between vast ages and miniscule time periods. The untold tales that are simply implied or referenced in the text are essential to Tolkien’s achievement in world-building, Peter Grybauskas argues, and counter the common but largely spurious image of Tolkien as a writer of bloated prose.

 


How Blood Works

| Filed under: Poetry, Recent Releases, Wick First Book
How Blood Works by Ellene Glenn Moore

In keeping with the central theme that the stories we tell ourselves—and, by extension, our understanding of who we are—are shaped by the spaces in which we tell them, the poems in How Blood Works vary drastically in form. From traditionally lineated lyrics to more architectural, segmented prose pieces, the poems themselves become a space for narratives of the self to play out.

 


The East River Ripper

| Filed under: Recent Releases, True Crime, True Crime History
The East River Ripper by George R. Dekle Sr.

Shortly after NYPD Chief of Detectives Thomas Byrnes publicly criticized the London police for failing to capture Jack the Ripper, he received a letter purportedly from Jack himself saying New York was his next target. Not long after, Byrnes was confronted by his own Ripper-style murder case in the death of Carrie Brown, a.k.a. “Old Shakespeare,” a colorful character who worked as a prostitute and had a penchant for quoting Shakespeare. People were worried that Jack might have actually come to America…

 


The Railroad Forger and the Detectives

| Filed under: Black Squirrel Books, Classic Detective Stories, Criminal Investigation, Recent Releases
A Double Life and the Detectives by Allan Pinkerton

In The Railroad Forger and the Detectives, real estate agent Thomas H. Cone vanishes suddenly. At the same time, the Pinkerton Detective Agency’s Philadelphia branch, helmed by Mr. Linden, is hired by the Adams Express railroad company to investigate a draft forgery case. Two checks totaling more than $1,200 had been intercepted in the mail and falsely endorsed by none other than Mr. Thomas Cone!

 


A Double Life and the Detectives

| Filed under: Black Squirrel Books, Classic Detective Stories, Criminal Investigation, Recent Releases
A Double Life and the Detectives cover

Detective Allan Pinkerton and his associates, including the indispensable Mr. Bangs, travel to Troyville, Pennsylvania—a beautiful village known for its rural beauty and community of farmers—to investigate the robbery of the Howard Express Company. The thieves made off with nearly $15,000 and vanished. Pinkerton learns that two suspicious men had arrived in town the morning before the robbery, and he races to track them down and discover their connection, if any, to the robbery.

 


Queen of the Con

| Filed under: Recent Releases, True Crime, True Crime History
Queen of the Con. Kent State University Press

Queen of the Con tells the true story of Cassie Chadwick, a successful swindler and “one of the top 10 imposters of all time,” according to Time magazine. Born Betsy Bigley in 1857 in Canada, she first operated as Madame Devere, a European clairvoyant, and in 1890 was arrested for defrauding a Toledo bank of $20,000. In the mid-1890s, while working as a madam in Cleveland, Cassie met and married a widowed physician with a coveted Euclid Avenue address.

 


The Complete Funky Winkerbean, Volume 10, 1999–2001

| Filed under: Art, Black Squirrel Books, Comics, Recent Releases

Funky Winkerbean, a newspaper staple since 1972, is one of the few comic strips that allows its characters to grow and age. As time passes and characters evolve, new and loyal readers alike are reminded that not only does Funky have a future, but the strip has a rich past. What remains a constant is Batiuk’s signature narrative-driven humor. This tenth volume, spanning from 1999 through 2001, embraces the strip’s past while casting an eye to a bright future.

 


Reading Hemingway’s Winner Take Nothing

and | Filed under: Hemingway Studies, Literature & Literary Criticism, Reading Hemingway, Recent Releases
Reading Hemingway's Winner Take Nothing cover

Through line-by-line annotations and accompanying commentary, this book weaves together the biographical, historical, and cultural threads of one of Hemingway’s more overlooked works, thus providing much needed guidance for Hemingway scholars and general readers alike.

 


Slavery

and | Filed under: Civil War Era, History, Interpreting American History, Recent Releases
Slavery: Interpreting American History. Kent State University Press

To fully understand the various ways in which slavery has been depicted and described is a difficult task. Like any other important historical issue, this requires a thorough grasp of the underlying history, methodological developments over time, and the contemporary politics and culture of historians’ own times. And the case of slavery is further complicated, of course, by changes in the legal and political status of African Americans in the 20th and 21st centuries.

 


No Place for Glory

| Filed under: Civil War Era, Civil War Soldiers and Strategies, Recent Releases, Understanding Civil War History
No Place for Glory/Wynstra. Kent State University Press

Over the years, many top historians have cited Major General Robert E. Rodes as the best division commander in Robert E. Lee’s vaunted army. Despite those accolades, Rodes faltered badly at Gettysburg, which stands as the only major blemish on his otherwise sterling record.

 


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