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The Uncommon Case of Daniel Brown

| Filed under: Discover Black History, Recent Releases, True Crime, True Crime History

In 1875, an Irish-born Baltimore policeman, Patrick McDonald, entered the home of Daniel Brown, an African American laborer, and clubbed and shot Brown, who died within an hour of the attack. In similar cases at the time, authorities routinely exonerated Maryland law enforcement officers who killed African Americans, usually without serious inquiries into the underlying facts. But in this case, Baltimore’s white community chose a different path. A coroner’s jury declined to attribute the killing to an accident or self-defense, the state’s attorney indicted McDonald and brought him to trial, and a criminal court jury convicted McDonald of manslaughter.

 


The Giants and Their City

| Filed under: Recent Releases
The Giants and Their City by Lincoln A. Mitchell. Kent State University Press

The San Francisco Giants have been one of the most successful franchises in baseball in the 21st century, as evidenced by the three World Series championship flags flying in the breeze over Oracle Park—one of the most beautiful baseball venues in the world. However, the team was not always so successful on or off the field. The Giants and Their City tells the story of a Giants franchise that had no recognizable stars, was last in the league in attendance, and had more than one foot out the door on the way to Toronto when a local businessman and a brand-new mayor found a way to keep the team in San Francisco.

 


My Dear Nelly

| Filed under: Civil War Era, Interpreting the Civil War: Texts and Contexts, Recent Releases
My Dear Nelly edited by Paul Taylor. Kent State University Press

More than 150 years after the end of the Civil War, West Point engineer and Brevet Brigadier General Orlando M. Poe (1832–1895) remains one of the Union’s most unsung heroes. He served the Union in uniform from day one of the conflict until the Confederate surrender in North Carolina in late April 1865, and he used his unparalleled ability to predict Confederate movements to lead multiple successful campaigns that turned the tide of the war. Accordingly, the roar of battle permeates this collection of 241 highly literate and previously unpublished wartime letters to his wife, Eleanor Brent Poe.

 


Translation and Time

| Filed under: Recent Releases, Translation Studies
Translation and Time by James St. André. Kent State University Press

This volume brings together 10 essays on the relation between temporality and translation, engaging in both theoretical reflection and consideration of concrete case studies. The essays can be read independently, but three major themes run through them and facilitate a discussion about the many ways in which the theoretical and practical consideration of temporality may provide new insights and research directions for translation studies.

 


On This Side of the Desert

| Filed under: Poetry, Recent Releases, Wick First Book
On This Side of the Desert by Alfredo Aguilar. Kent State University Press

This debut book of poetry describes the experience of being raised in southern California as a child of Mexican immigrants in the shadow of the borderlands. Just as the borderlands are defined by the desert, so, too, are its inhabitants defined by their families, their culture shaped from the clay of the Sonoran desert and given life by the nourishing water of their ancestors. In these poems, the desert is recognized for what it truly is—a living, breathing body filled with both joy and pain.

 


Problem Plants of Ohio

, and | Filed under: Environmental Studies, Horticulture, Nature, Recent Releases, Regional Interest
Problem Plants of Ohio by Griffiths, Davis, and Ward. Kent State University Press

Problem Plants of Ohio is an informative guide, providing information on the identification and control of nonnative plant species formally listed as invasive or prohibited noxious weeds in Ohio. In addition, the book treats many additional species that are considered a nuisance in gardens, landscaping, or natural settings.

 


The Turnpike Rivalry

and | Filed under: Black Squirrel Books, Recent Releases, Regional Interest, Sports
The Turnpike Rivalry by Richard and Stephen Peterson. Kent State University Press

Football historians regard the games between the Cleveland Browns and the Pittsburgh Steelers as the basis for one of the greatest rivalries in NFL history. Authors Richard Peterson and Stephen Peterson, in telling the engaging story of these teams who play only a two-hour drive along the turnpike from each other, explore the reasons behind this intense rivalry and the details of its ups and downs for each team and its fans.

 


Bank Robbers and the Detectives

| Filed under: Black Squirrel Books, Classic Detective Stories, Criminal Investigation, Recent Releases
Bank Robbers and the Detectives by Allan Pinkertons. Kent State University Press

Upon receiving a telegram that reads, “First National Bank robbed, please come, or send at once” from Thomas Locke in Somerset, Michigan, Pinkerton sets off to investigate the crime. After journeying to the quaint town in a blizzard, the detective learns that $65,000 of treasury bonds, notes, and cash had disappeared from the bank’s vault overnight. Only one man knew the combination: the bank’s cashier, Mr. Norton. When Pinkerton’s subsequent examination of the crime scene reveals no signs of forced entry, it starts to look like Mr. Norton committed the crime.

 


The Murderer and the Fortune Teller

| Filed under: Black Squirrel Books, Classic Detective Stories, Criminal Investigation, Recent Releases
The Murderer and the Fortune Teller by Allan Pinkerton. Kent State University Press

Captain J. N. Sumner from Springfield, Massachusetts, hires Pinkerton to help solve a crime involving his sisters and the deed to a family farm. His younger sister Annie falls under the charms of a married man, Mr. Pattmore, who promises to marry Annie once his wife and her brother are out of the way. Captain Sumner possesses an opal ring with a stone that appears to foretell events. After suddenly falling violently ill, he becomes convinced his sister is trying to poison him to get his fortune and, more importantly, his ring.

 


The Detective and the Somnambulist

| Filed under: Black Squirrel Books, Classic Detective Stories, Criminal Investigation, Recent Releases
Pinkerton-Detective and Somnambulist cover. kent State University Press

Pinkerton travels to Atkinson, Mississippi, to investigate the murder of bank teller George Gordon and the theft of more than $130,000 in the City Bank of Atkinson. Atkinson appears at first to be no more than a quiet town of shopkeepers, laborers, and businessmen. But dark secrets lurk beneath the town’s Southern facade, and Pinkerton wastes no time in discovering them. Traveling under the guise of a cotton speculator, Pinkerton makes inquiries into the crime without drawing suspicion.

 


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