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Letters to Lizzie

| Filed under: Civil War Era, History, Interpreting the Civil War: Texts and Contexts, Recent Releases, U.S. History
Letters to Lizzie cover

Letters to Lizzie: The Story of Sixteen Men in the Civil War and the One Woman Who Connected Them All contains a collection of letters exchanged between 16 men—15 soldiers and a quartermaster at a military hospital—and one young woman, Lizzie Brick. Since Lizzie herself could not bear arms, she took up her pen and through ongoing correspondence helped these Union soldiers sustain their motivation for the cause.

 


No Place for a Woman

| Filed under: American History, Civil War Era, History, Interpreting the Civil War: Texts and Contexts, Recent Releases
No Place for a Woman by Mike Pride. Cover.

Historian Mike Pride traces Harriet Dame’s service as a field nurse with a storied New Hampshire infantry regiment during the Peninsula campaign, Second Bull Run, Gettysburg, and Cold Harbor. Twice during that service, Dame was briefly captured. In early 1863, she spent months running a busy enterprise in Washington, DC, that connected families at home to soldiers in the field.

 


Slavery

and | Filed under: Civil War Era, History, Interpreting American History, Recent Releases
Slavery: Interpreting American History. Kent State University Press

To fully understand the various ways in which slavery has been depicted and described is a difficult task. Like any other important historical issue, this requires a thorough grasp of the underlying history, methodological developments over time, and the contemporary politics and culture of historians’ own times. And the case of slavery is further complicated, of course, by changes in the legal and political status of African Americans in the 20th and 21st centuries.

 


A Notable Bully

| Filed under: Civil War Era, History, Interpreting the Civil War: Texts and Contexts, Recent Releases, Understanding Civil War History
A Notable Bully/Cray. Kent State University Press

Largely forgotten by historians, Billy Wilson (1822–1874) was a giant in his time, a man well known throughout New York City, a man shaped by the city’s immigrant culture, its harsh voting practices, and its efforts to participate in the War for the Union. For decades, Wilson’s name made headlines—for many different reasons—in the city’s major newspapers.

 


A Young Sailor at War

| Filed under: Books, History, Military History, Recent Releases

While a number of published collections of World War II letters are available to readers, few rise to the level of war literature. But A Young Sailor at War: The World War II Letters of William R. Catton Jr. is remarkable for the narrative skill, exuberance, and candor of its letter writer, and for his youthful but thoughtful commentary. Edited by his son Theodore, Catton’s letters give us a truly intimate look into an essential piece of history.

 


Cleveland A to Z

and | Filed under: Black Squirrel Books, History, Recent Releases, Regional Interest
Cleveland A to Z by John Grabowski. Kent State University Press.

Cities around the globe, whether large or small, have characteristics that create a particular identity. So what about Cleveland? What are its nuances, its images? In addressing that question, Cleveland A to Z is not a typical city guide. Rather than concentrating solely on the usual topics—landmarks, restaurants, shopping, and notable facts—this guide touches on deeper themes related to Cleveland’s people, places, stories, and events. These 72 short articles reveal details about the city’s rich history, while also hinting at the issues, attitudes, and even the quirks that define Cleveland’s character. Cleveland A to Z truly serves as an entry point for a fuller exploration of the city’s history.

 


A Century of Flight at Paton Field

and | Filed under: History, Recent Releases, Regional Interest
A Century of Flight at Paton Field by Schloman & Schloman. Kent State University Press.

This detailed and well-illustrated study explores the hundred-year history of the longest-surviving public-use airport in Ohio. Intertwining the story of the airport’s development with the history of flight-education programs at the University, the book highlights a vast cast of characters and an examination of aviation’s development on the local level throughout the last century.

 


Zoar

| Filed under: History, Recent Releases, Regional Interest
Zoar by Kathleen M. Fernandez. Kent State University Press

In 1817, a group of German religious dis­senters immigrated to Ohio. Less than two years later, in order to keep their distinctive religion and its adherents together, they formed a communal society (eine güter gemeinschaft or “community of goods”), where all shared equally. Their bold experiment thrived and continued through three generations; the Zoar Separatists are considered one of the longest-lasting communal groups in US history.

 


Witnessing the American Century 

and | Filed under: Audiobooks, Autobiography & Memoirs, History, Recent Releases, U.S. History
Witnessing the American Century by Allen Colby Brady. Kent State University Press

More than just a memoir, Brady’s book is an important document from one of the last of his generation, reminding us of the pivotal moments that should not be lost to history. Witnessing the American Century is Captain Brady’s firsthand account of his incredible life, and his memories elucidate America’s role in the most significant world events from the previous century.

 


The Insanity Defense and the Mad Murderess of Shaker Heights

| Filed under: Audiobooks, Award Winners, History, Recent Releases, Regional Interest, True Crime, True Crime History
The Insanity Defense and the Mad Murderess of Shaker Heights by William L. Tabac. Kent State University Press

They have no witnesses. They have no case. With this blunt observation, Mariann Colby—an attractive, church-going Shaker Heights, Ohio, mother and housewife—bet a defense psychiatrist that she would not be convicted of murder. A lack of witnesses was not the only problem that would confront the State of Ohio in 1966, which would seek to prosecute her for shooting to death Cremer Young Jr., her son’s nine-year-old playmate: Colby had deftly cleaned up after herself by hiding the child’s body miles from her home and concealing the weapon.

 


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