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Through Blood and Fire

| Filed under: Civil War Era, Forthcoming, History, Interpreting the Civil War: Texts and Contexts, U.S. History
Through Blood and Fire by J. Gregory Acken. KSUPress

Charles J. Mills, the scion of a wealthy, prominent Boston family, experienced a privileged upbringing and was educated at Harvard University. When the Civil War began, Mills, like many of his college classmates, sought to secure a commission in the army. After a year of unsuccessful attempts, Mills was appointed second lieutenant in the Second Massachusetts Infantry in August 1862; however, he was seriously wounded at Antietam a month later. Following a nearly yearlong recovery, Mills eventually reentered the service as a staff officer, although he remained physically disabled for the rest of his life. He was initially with the Ninth Corps during the Overland and Petersburg Campaigns and later at the Second Corps headquarters.

 


What We Bring to the Practice of Medicine

and | Filed under: Health Humanities, Literature & Medicine, Recent Releases, Women’s Studies
What We Bring. Green and Liebowitz.

While men and women physicians face different challenges and bring different historical experiences to the examination table, the history of medicine has been primarily told by men. Doctors Kimberly Greene-Liebowitz and Dana Corriel compile the pieces in this collection to highlight the many topics of concern for women physicians––some of which may be unknown to medical field outsiders. Topics include the physician-patient relationship, mastery of clinical practice, barriers to career advancement and success, and the challenge of balancing a demanding professional life with domestic responsibilities, an issue brought to the fore by the COVID-19 pandemic.

 


Dressing à la Turque

| Filed under: Costume Society of America, Fashion History, Forthcoming
Dressing a la Turque. Van Cleave.

While French fashion has historically set the bar across the Western world, the cultural influences that inspired it are often obscured. Dressing à la Turque examines the theatrical depictions of Ottoman costumes, or Turkish dress, and demonstrates the French fascination for this foreign culture and its clothing. The impact, however, went far beyond costumes worn for art and theater, as Ottoman-inspired fashions became the most prominent and popular themes in French women’s fashion throughout the 18th century.

 


The Governor’s Pawns

| Filed under: Civil War Era, Forthcoming, Interpreting the Civil War: Texts and Contexts
The Governor's Pawns/Randall S. Gooden. KSUPress

While the taking of hostages by both the Union and the Confederacy was common during the Civil War, it was unique for an individual state government to engage in this practice. The Governor’s Pawns highlights the implementation of a hostage law established by Virginia’s pro-Union government in 1863 and the adoption of that law by the newly formed state of West Virginia. Author Randall Gooden uses genealogical sources to emphasize the personal nature of civilian arrests and hostage-taking and describes the impact on the communities and individuals left scarred by this practice. Readers are taken into the state and national capitol buildings, army camps, jails and military prisons, hospitals, and graveyards that accompanied the tit-for-tat style of pointedly personal warfare.

 


Black Hair in a White World

| Filed under: African American Studies, Costume Society of America, Fashion History, Forthcoming
Black Hair in a White World by Tameka N. Ellington. KSUPress

Black Hair in a White World is a groundbreaking, serious study of the cultural history, perceptions, and increasing acceptance of Black hair in broader American society. Editor Tameka N. Ellington brings together a varied group of scholars who together make an important contribution to ongoing discussions about race, gender, sociology, and self-expression.

 


Letters to Lizzie

| Filed under: Civil War Era, History, Interpreting the Civil War: Texts and Contexts, Recent Releases, U.S. History
Letters to Lizzie cover

Letters to Lizzie: The Story of Sixteen Men in the Civil War and the One Woman Who Connected Them All contains a collection of letters exchanged between 16 men—15 soldiers and a quartermaster at a military hospital—and one young woman, Lizzie Brick. Since Lizzie herself could not bear arms, she took up her pen and through ongoing correspondence helped these Union soldiers sustain their motivation for the cause.

 


No Place for a Woman

| Filed under: American History, Civil War Era, History, Interpreting the Civil War: Texts and Contexts, Recent Releases
No Place for a Woman by Mike Pride. Cover.

Historian Mike Pride traces Harriet Dame’s service as a field nurse with a storied New Hampshire infantry regiment during the Peninsula campaign, Second Bull Run, Gettysburg, and Cold Harbor. Twice during that service, Dame was briefly captured. In early 1863, she spent months running a busy enterprise in Washington, DC, that connected families at home to soldiers in the field.

 


Sister Tongue زبان خواهر

| Filed under: Books, Poetry, Recent Releases, Wick First Book
Sister Tongue cover image

The poems in Sister Tongue explore negative spaces—the distance between twin sisters, between lovers, between Farsi and English, between the poet’s upbringing in California and her family in Iran. This space between vibrates with loss and longing, arcing with tension. Farnaz Fatemi’s poetry delves into the intricacies of the relational space between people, the depth of ancestral roots, and the visceral memories that shimmer beyond the reach of words.

 


Conservation Concerns in Fashion Collections

and | Filed under: Clothing & Costume, Costume Society of America, Education, Fashion History, Recent Releases
Conservation Concerns in Fashion Collections cover. Kent State University Press

Continuous innovation and experimentation with the materials used in constructing textiles, apparel, and accessories creates an ever-growing challenge for professional curators and collectors. Recognizing problematic fibers, dyes, finishes, and fabric and yarn constructions is crucial for maintaining objects’ appearance, minimizing deterioration, and isolating those that are potentially harmful to other objects.

 


Red, White, and Blue on the Runway

| Filed under: Clothing & Costume, Costume Society of America, Political Science & Politics, Recent Releases
Chrisman-Campbell Cover

On February 29, 1968, the White House hosted its first—and only—fashion show. At the time, the patriotic event was lauded by the press, and many predicted it would become an annual occasion, especially since fashion had grown to become the fourth largest industry in the United States, employing 1.4 million Americans, more than 80 percent of them women. But the social and political turmoil of that particular year—from the Vietnam War, the civil rights movement, and the assassinations of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Sen. Robert F. Kennedy—cast a shadow over the festivities.

 


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