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Diplomatic Studies

Greek-American Relations from Monroe to Truman

| Filed under: Diplomatic Studies, New Studies in U.S. Foreign Relations
Repousis_web

Repousis chronicles American public attitudes and government policies toward modern Greece from its war for independence (1821–1829) to the Truman Doctrine (1947) when Washington intervened to keep Greece from coming under communist domination.

 


Buried in the Sands of the Ogaden

| Filed under: Diplomatic Studies, New Studies in U.S. Foreign Relations
Woodroofe-hr

When the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT) between the Soviet Union and United States faltered during the administration of Jimmy Carter, National Security Advisor Zbigniew Brzezinski claimed that “SALT lies buried in the sands of the Ogaden.” How did superpower détente survive Vietnam but stumble…

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NATO before the Korean War

| Filed under: Diplomatic Studies, New Studies in U.S. Foreign Relations, Political Science & Politics, U.S. Foreign Relations
Kaplan_web

Conventional wisdom has the Korean War putting the “O” in NATO. Prior to that time, from the signing of the North Atlantic Treaty on April 4, 1949, to the North Korean invasion of South Korea on June 25, 1950, the Treaty allies were just going…

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The American Revolution through British Eyes

and | Filed under: American History, Diplomatic Studies, Military History
Barnes Cover

The letters in this collection were written mostly by British military officers and diplomats reporting directly to their superiors in London. Many of the writers were actively engaged in fighting the Americans from 1775 until 1783; others were colonial administrators traveling through North America assessing…

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Donn Piatt

| Filed under: Biography, Diplomatic Studies, History
Bridges_Piatt

Born in 1819 in Cincinnati, Donn Piatt died in 1891 at the Piatt Castles that still stand in western Ohio. He was a diplomat, historian, journalist, judge, lawyer, legislator, lobbyist, novelist, playwright, poet, and politician—and a well-known humorist, once called on to replace Mark Twain…

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Safe for Decolonization

| Filed under: Diplomatic Studies, New Studies in U.S. Foreign Relations, U.S. Foreign Relations
Long-small

In the first decade after World War II, Singapore underwent radical political and socioeconomic changes with the progressive retreat of Great Britain from its Southeast Asian colonial empire. The United States, under the Eisenhower administration, sought to fill the vacuum left by the British retreat…

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Seeing Drugs

| Filed under: Diplomatic Studies, New Studies in U.S. Foreign Relations, U.S. Foreign Relations
Weimer-small

Through interdisciplinary and comparative analysis, Seeing Drugs examines the contours of the burgeoning drug war, the cultural significance of drugs and addiction, and their links to the formation of national identity within the United States, Thailand, Burma, and Mexico. By highlighting the prevalence of modernization…

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