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Posts Tagged ‘ Tolkien ’

“There Would Always Be a Fairy Tale”: More Essays on Tolkien shortlisted for Tolkien Society Best Book Award

| Filed under: News

Great News! Our latest title examining the world of J.R.R Tolkien, especially his lifelong interest in fairy stories, is up for a well deserved award. “There Would Always Be a Fairy Tale”: More Essays on Tolkien by Verlyn Flieger has been shortlisted by the Tolkien Society for their 2018 Best Book Award. Vote now if you’re a member. [...]

 


Bandersnatch

| Filed under: Black Squirrel Books, Fresh Insights into Modern British Literature, Literature & Literary Criticism
Glyer cover image

C. S. Lewis, J. R. R. Tolkien, and the other Inklings met each week to read and discuss each other’s works-in-progress, offering both encouragement and blistering critique. How did these conversations shape the books they were writing? How does creative collaboration enhance individual talent? And what can we learn from their example?

 


Arda Inhabited

| Filed under: Audiobooks, Fresh Insights into Modern British Literature, Literature & Literary Criticism
Jeffers cover

With the box office successes of movies based on The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit, familiarity with J. R. R. Tolkien’s Middle-Earth is growing. Unfortunately, scholarship dealing with Middle-Earth itself is comparatively rare in Tolkien studies, and students and scholars seeking greater insight have few resources. Similarly, although public concern for the environment is widespread and “going green” has never been trendier, ecocriticism is also an underserved area of literary studies. Arda Inhabited fills a gap in both areas by combining ecocritical and broader postmodern concerns with the growing appreciation for Tolkien’s Middle-Earth.

 


Green Suns and Faerie

| Filed under: Fresh Insights into Modern British Literature, Literature & Literary Criticism, Science Fiction and Fantasy
Flieger-mr

With the release of Peter Jackson’s The Lord of the Rings movie trilogy and forthcoming film version of The Hobbit, J. R. R. Tolkien’s popularity has never been higher. In Green Suns and Faërie, author Verlyn Flieger, one of world’s foremost Tolkien scholars, presents a selection of her best articles—some never before published—on a range of Tolkien topics. The essays are divided into three distinct sections. The first explores Tolkien’s ideas of sub-creation–the making of a Secondary World and its relation to the real world, the second looks at Tolkien’s reconfiguration of the medieval story tradition, and the third places his work firmly within the context of the twentieth century and “modernist” literature.

 


The Plants of Middle-earth: Botany and Sub-creation

| Filed under: Fresh Insights into Modern British Literature, Literature & Literary Criticism
Hazell Book Cover

The Plants of Middle-earth draws on biography, literary sources, and cultural history and is unique in using botany as the focal point for examining the complex network of elements that comprise Tolkien’s creation. Each chapter includes the plants’ description, uses, history, and lore, which frequently lead to their thematic and interpretive implications. The book will appeal to general readers, students, and teachers of Tolkien as well as to those with an interest in plant lore and botanical illustration.

 


The Company They Keep

| Filed under: Audiobooks, Award Winners, Fresh Insights into Modern British Literature, Literature & Literary Criticism
Glyer Book Cover

This important study challenges the standard interpretation that Lewis, Tolkien, Charles Williams, Owen Barfield, and the other Inklings had little influence on one another’s work, drawing on the latest research in composition studies and the sociology of the creative process. Diana Glyer invites readers into the heart of the group, examining diary entries and personal letters and carefully comparing the rough drafts of their manuscripts with their final, published work.

 


Interrupted Music

| Filed under: Fresh Insights into Modern British Literature, Literature & Literary Criticism, Science Fiction and Fantasy
Music Book Cover

In Interrupted Music Flieger attempts to illuminate the structure of Tolkien’s work, allowing the reader to appreciate its broad, overarching design and its careful, painstaking construction. She endeavors to “follow the music from its beginning as an idea in Tolkien’s mind through to his final but never-implemented mechanism for realizing that idea, for bringing the voices of his story to the reading public.” In addition, Flieger reviews attempts at mythmaking in the history of English literature by Spenser, Milton, and Blake as well as by Joyce and Yeats. She reflects on the important differences between Tolkien and his predecessors and even more between Tolkien and his contemporaries.

 


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