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From Garfield to Harding

| Filed under: Recent Releases, U.S. History
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In 1880, James Garfield decided to try something new: rather than run the typical passive campaign for president, he would welcome voters to his farm. By the end of the campaign, thousands of people—including naturalized voters, African Americans, women, men from various occupations, and young voters—traveled to Garfield’s home, listened to him speak, shook hands, met his family, and were invited inside. The press reported the interactions across the country. Not only did Garfield win, but he started a new campaign technique that then carried three other Republicans to the presidency.

 


The Health Humanities and Camus’s The Plague

| Filed under: Literature & Medicine, Recent Releases
The Health and Humanities and Camus's Plague edited by Woods Nash. Kent State University Press.

Camus’s The Plague, first published in 1947, is widely regarded as a classic of 20th-century fiction and as an interesting point of reference for the field of health humanities. Woods Nash’s edited collection of essays by diverse hands explores how The Plague illuminates important themes, ideas, dilemmas, and roles in modern healthcare, helping readers—and particularly medical students and professionals—understand issues related to their training and practice in a dramatic and stimulating context.

 


Moments of Truth

| Filed under: May 4 Resources, Photography, Recent Releases, U.S. History
Moments of Truth/Howard Ruffner. Kent State University Press

Here, in Moments of Truth: A Photo­grapher’s Experience of Kent State 1970, Ruffner not only reproduces a collection of nearly 150 of his photographs—many never before published—but also offers a stirring narrative in which he revisits his work and attempts to further examine these events and his own experience of them. It is, indeed, an intensely personal journey that he invites us to share.

 


I Hear the World Sing

, and | Filed under: Poetry, Recent Releases
I Hear the World Sing by Hassler, Jewel & Siciarz

When schoolchildren from Kent, Ohio, and Florence, Italy, were invited to express their thoughts about “Where I’m From” in poetry, the connections that emerged between these students from different continents were remarkable. Their responses to this prompt—“lo vengo da” in Italian—demonstrate the underlying importance of home, families, the natural world, and the creative identities that children harbor within them.

 


Hemingway’s Short Stories

| Filed under: Hemingway Studies, Literature & Literary Criticism, Recent Releases, Teaching Hemingway
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Sometimes characterized as the most significant author since Shakespeare, Ernest Hemingway was an acknowledged master of the short story, with his groundbreaking style and its apparent simplicity and honesty changing the nature of English prose fiction. While in the early 1920s some mainstream editors seemed baffled by their subtlety, today his stories are mainstays in the classroom, taught at all levels from secondary school through university graduate courses.

 


Archetypal Figures in “The Snows of Kilimanjaro”

| Filed under: Hemingway Studies, Literature & Literary Criticism, Recent Releases
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Hemingway’s short story, “The Snows of Kilimanjaro,” has secured a place among the greatest works in that genre—the story is widely considered Hemingway’s greatest. To explore the richness of this work, David L. Anderson returns to a somewhat unusual approach, that of archetypal criticism, which allows us to examine the story in more universal, rather than strictly historical, ways.

 


Bigamy and Bloodshed

| Filed under: Recent Releases, True Crime, True Crime History
Bigamy and Bloodshed by Larry E. Wood. Kent State University Press.

In the summer of 1885, ex-convict George Graham bigamously married Cora Lee, foster daughter of nationally known temperance revivalist Emma Molloy, and the three took up residence together on the Molloy farm near Springfield, Missouri. When the body of Graham’s first wife, Sarah, was found at the bottom of an abandoned well on the farm early the next year, Graham was charged with murder, and Cora and Emma were implicated as accessories. As Larry E. Wood notes, this sensational story made headlines across the country and threatened Mrs. Molloy’s career as a prominent evangelist and temperance revivalist.

 


Cleveland A to Z

and | Filed under: Black Squirrel Books, History, Recent Releases, Regional Interest
Cleveland A to Z by John Grabowski. Kent State University Press.

Cities around the globe, whether large or small, have characteristics that create a particular identity. So what about Cleveland? What are its nuances, its images? In addressing that question, Cleveland A to Z is not a typical city guide. Rather than concentrating solely on the usual topics—landmarks, restaurants, shopping, and notable facts—this guide touches on deeper themes related to Cleveland’s people, places, stories, and events. These 72 short articles reveal details about the city’s rich history, while also hinting at the issues, attitudes, and even the quirks that define Cleveland’s character. Cleveland A to Z truly serves as an entry point for a fuller exploration of the city’s history.

 


Untouched by the Conflict

and | Filed under: Recent Releases, U.S. History
Untouched by the Conflict by White and Glenn. Kent State University Press

Nearly three million white men of military age remained in the North during the Civil War, some attending institutions of higher learning. College life during the Civil War has received little close attention, however, in part because of the lack of published collections of letters and diaries by students during the war. In Untouched by the Conflict, Jonathan W. White and Daniel Glenn seek to fill that gap by presenting the unabridged letters of Singleton Ashenfelter, a student at Dickinson College in Pennsylvania, to his closest friend at home near Philadelphia.

 


A Century of Flight at Paton Field

and | Filed under: History, Recent Releases, Regional Interest
A Century of Flight at Paton Field by Schloman & Schloman. Kent State University Press.

This detailed and well-illustrated study explores the hundred-year history of the longest-surviving public-use airport in Ohio. Intertwining the story of the airport’s development with the history of flight-education programs at the University, the book highlights a vast cast of characters and an examination of aviation’s development on the local level throughout the last century.

 


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