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Civil War Soldiers and Strategies

Book proposals and CVs should be sent to:
Dr. Brian S. Wills, Director
The Center for the Study of the Civil War Era
Kennesaw State University
1000 Chastain Road, MD2201, Bldg 22, Rm 3016
Kennesaw, GA 30144-5591 USA
bwills2@kennesaw.edu
Brian S. Wills, Editor
Civil War Soldiers and Strategies is a series designed to offer scholars the opportunity to present examinations of the martial aspects of the American Civil War Era. Expansion of such studies from a traditional focus on battles and leaders has led to the inclusion of many new voices and perspectives. This series takes advantage of those new directions as well as presenting studies that will help us better understand the people who participated in waging war and the engagements that determined the ultimate outcome and aftermath of the conflict. Volumes appropriate for the series include monographs, biographies, edited works, and primary sources.

At the Forefront of Lee’s Invasion

| Filed under: Civil War Era, Civil War Soldiers and Strategies, Forthcoming, Military History, U.S. History
Cover image not yet available

After clearing Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley of Federal troops, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s bold invasion into the North reached the Maryland shore of the Potomac River on June 15, 1863. A week later, the Confederate infantry crossed into lower Pennsylvania, where they had their first sustained interactions with the civilian population in a solidly pro-Union state. Most of the initial encounters with the people in the lush Cumberland Valley and the neighboring parts of the state involved the men from the Army of Northern Virginia’s famed Second Corps, commanded by Lt. Gen. Richard S. Ewell, who led the way as Lee’s veteran soldiers advanced north toward their eventual showdown with the Union army at the crossroads town of Gettysburg.

 


Meade

| Filed under: Civil War Era, Civil War Soldiers and Strategies, Forthcoming, Military History, U.S. History
Meade Cover

George Gordon Meade has not been treated kindly by history. Victorious at Gettysburg, the biggest battle of the American Civil War, Meade was the longest-serving commander of the Army of the Potomac, leading his army through the brutal Overland Campaign and on to the surrender of Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox. Serving alongside his new superior, Ulysses S. Grant, in the last year of the war, his role has been overshadowed by the popular Grant. This first full-length study of Meade’s two-year tenure as commander of the Army of the Potomac brings him out of Grant’s shadow and into focus as one of the top three Union generals of the war.

 


Phantoms of the South Fork

| Filed under: Civil War Era, Civil War Soldiers and Strategies, History, Military History, Recent Releases, U.S. History, Understanding Civil War History
French cover

At 3 a.m. on February 21, 1865, a band of 65 Confederate horsemen slowly made its way down Greene Street in Cumberland, Maryland. Thinking the riders were disguised Union scouts, the few Union soldiers out that bitterly cold morning paid little attention to them. In the meantime, over 3,500 Yankee soldiers peacefully slept.

 


“My Greatest Quarrel with Fortune”

| Filed under: Civil War Era, Civil War Soldiers and Strategies, Military History, Understanding Civil War History
Beemer cover Image

Lew Wallace of Indiana was a self-taught extraordinary military talent. With boldness and celerity, he advanced in less than a year from the rank of colonel of the 11th Indiana to that of major general commanding the 3rd Division at Shiloh. Ultimately, his civilian, amateur military status collided headlong with the professional military culture being assiduously cultivated by Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck, a cautious and difficult commander. The fallout was aggravated by Wallace’s unwillingness to acknowledge the protocols that sustained the military chain of command. The primary result of the collision was that he failed to realize his most cherished ambition: leading men in battle.

 


Work for Giants

| Filed under: Civil War Era, Civil War Soldiers and Strategies, History, Military History
Parson cover

During the summer of 1864 a Union column, commanded by Maj. Gen. Andrew Jackson Smith, set out from Tennessee with a goal that had proven impossible in all prior attempts—to find and defeat the cavalry under the command of Confederate major general Nathan Bedford Forrest. Forrest’s cavalry was the greatest threat to the long supply line feeding Sherman’s armies as they advanced on Atlanta.

 


Richmond Must Fall

| Filed under: Civil War Era, Civil War Soldiers and Strategies, Military History
Newsome Cover

In the fall of 1864, the Civil War’s outcome rested largely on Abraham Lincoln’s success in the upcoming presidential election. As the contest approached, cautious optimism buoyed the President’s supporters in the wake of Union victories at Atlanta and in the Shenandoah Valley. With all eyes on the upcoming election, Robert E. Lee and Ulysses S. Grant conducted a series of large-scale military operations outside Richmond and Petersburg, which have, until now, received little attention.

 



This is a Civil War S&S archive