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Posts Tagged ‘ hemingway ’

Hemingway’s Short Stories

| Filed under: Forthcoming, Hemingway Studies, Literature & Literary Criticism, Teaching Hemingway
Hemingway's Short Stories by Frederic J. Svaboda. Kent State University Press

Sometimes characterized as the most significant author since Shakespeare, Ernest Hemingway was an acknowledged master of the short story, with his groundbreaking style and its apparent simplicity and honesty changing the nature of English prose fiction. While in the early 1920s some mainstream editors seemed baffled by their subtlety, today his stories are mainstays in the classroom, taught at all levels from secondary school through university graduate courses.

 


Hemingway in the Digital Age

| Filed under: Hemingway Studies, Literature & Literary Criticism, Recent Releases, Teaching Hemingway
Hemingway in the Digital Age. Edited by Laura Godfrey

How can we convince readers, and especially students, to slow down to the crawl that is often necessary to see the real power in the compressed language Hemingway uses to tell a story? Are there qualities of digital age life that make students, somehow, more connected to Hemingway’s life and his writing? How can we compare the 21st-century “transhumanist” interest in making ourselves into “something more than merely human” with Hemingway’s characters like Nick Adams, Jake Barnes, Frederic Henry, Catherine Barkley, Pilar, Robert Jordan, or Santiago, all of whom similarly wrestle within the bounds of their own mortality? Laura Godfrey has assembled a group of scholars who speak eloquently to these questions.

 


Archetypal Figures in “The Snows of Kilimanjaro”

| Filed under: Forthcoming, Hemingway Studies, Literature & Literary Criticism
Archetypal Figures in "The Snows of Kilimanjaro” by David L. Anderson. Kent State University Press.

Hemingway’s short story, “The Snows of Kilimanjaro,” has secured a place among the greatest works in that genre—the story is widely considered Hemingway’s greatest. To explore the richness of this work, David L. Anderson returns to a somewhat unusual approach, that of archetypal criticism, which allows us to examine the story in more universal, rather than strictly historical, ways.

 


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