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Recent Releases

Cleveland A to Z

and | Filed under: Black Squirrel Books, History, Recent Releases, Regional Interest
Cleveland A to Z by John Grabowski. Kent State University Press.

Cities around the globe, whether large or small, have characteristics that create a particular identity. So what about Cleveland? What are its nuances, its images? In addressing that question, Cleveland A to Z is not a typical city guide. Rather than concentrating solely on the usual topics—landmarks, restaurants, shopping, and notable facts—this guide touches on deeper themes related to Cleveland’s people, places, stories, and events. These 72 short articles reveal details about the city’s rich history, while also hinting at the issues, attitudes, and even the quirks that define Cleveland’s character. Cleveland A to Z truly serves as an entry point for a fuller exploration of the city’s history.

 


Untouched by the Conflict

and | Filed under: Recent Releases, U.S. History
Untouched by the Conflict by White and Glenn. Kent State University Press

Nearly three million white men of military age remained in the North during the Civil War, some attending institutions of higher learning. College life during the Civil War has received little close attention, however, in part because of the lack of published collections of letters and diaries by students during the war. In Untouched by the Conflict, Jonathan W. White and Daniel Glenn seek to fill that gap by presenting the unabridged letters of Singleton Ashenfelter, a student at Dickinson College in Pennsylvania, to his closest friend at home near Philadelphia.

 


A Century of Flight at Paton Field

and | Filed under: History, Recent Releases, Regional Interest
A Century of Flight at Paton Field by Schloman & Schloman. Kent State University Press.

This detailed and well-illustrated study explores the hundred-year history of the longest-surviving public-use airport in Ohio. Intertwining the story of the airport’s development with the history of flight-education programs at the University, the book highlights a vast cast of characters and an examination of aviation’s development on the local level throughout the last century.

 


Hemingway in the Digital Age

| Filed under: Hemingway Studies, Literature & Literary Criticism, Recent Releases, Teaching Hemingway
Hemingway in the Digital Age. Edited by Laura Godfrey

How can we convince readers, and especially students, to slow down to the crawl that is often necessary to see the real power in the compressed language Hemingway uses to tell a story? Are there qualities of digital age life that make students, somehow, more connected to Hemingway’s life and his writing? How can we compare the 21st-century “transhumanist” interest in making ourselves into “something more than merely human” with Hemingway’s characters like Nick Adams, Jake Barnes, Frederic Henry, Catherine Barkley, Pilar, Robert Jordan, or Santiago, all of whom similarly wrestle within the bounds of their own mortality? Laura Godfrey has assembled a group of scholars who speak eloquently to these questions.

 


A Woman Condemned

| Filed under: Recent Releases, True Crime, True Crime History
A Woman Condemned by James M. Greiner. Kent State University Press

At first glance, the 1932 Easter morning murder of Salvatore “Sam” Antonio had all the trademarks of a gang-related murder. Shot five times, stabbed a dozen more, Antonio was left for dead. His body was rolled into a culvert south of Albany, New York. It was only by chance that the mortally wounded Antonio was discovered and brought to the hospital. He died in the emergency room without ever naming his assailant.

 


Blanton’s Browns

| Filed under: Black Squirrel Books, Recent Releases, Regional Interest, Sports
Blanton's Browns by Roger Gordon. Kent State University Press

Two very exciting games in Cleveland Browns history—their upset of the Baltimore Colts in 1964 and the Monday Night Football game on September 21, 1970, when they beat Joe Namath and the New York Jets—bookend this in-depth look at a highly successful era in the franchise’s history. During the five years from 1965–69, the Browns qualified for the postseason four times, played in three NFL championship games, and twice came within a game of the Super Bowl.

 


The Many Names for Mother

| Filed under: Poetry, Recent Releases, Wick First Book
The Many Names for Mother/Julia Kolchinsky Dasbach. Kent State University Press

The Many Names for Mother is an exploration of intergenerational motherhood; its poems reach toward the future even as they reflect on the past. This evocative collection hovers around history, trauma, and absence—from ancestral histories of anti-Semitic discrimination in the former Soviet Union to the poet’s travels, while pregnant with her son, to death camp sites in Poland. As a descendant of Holocaust survivors, Dasbach ponders how the weight of her Jewish-refugee immigrant experience comes to influence her raising of a first-generation, bilingual, and multiethnic American child.

 


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