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Posts Tagged ‘ History ’

Boxscore News reviews The ’63 Steelers

| Filed under: News

Boxscore News reviews The ’63 Steelers: A Renegade Team’s Chase for Glory by Rudy Dicks.
“Author Rudy Dicks guides us thru the Steelers 1963 season game by game taking us into the clubhouse and at times inside the huddle. He details mercurial Head Coach Buddy Parker’s tactics and back story. Parker and the Pittsburgh faithful find the team [...]

 


Publisher’s Weekly features The Other Veterans of WWII

| Filed under: News

Publisher’s Weekly features The Other Veterans of WWII by Rona Simmons. https://bit.ly/3bBMyMi
Find out more about the book at: http://www.kentstateuniversitypress.com/…/other-veterans-o…/

 


The Hemingway Society reprints “Love in the Time of Influenza: Hemingway and the 1918 Pandemic”

| Filed under: News

The Hemingway Society reprints “Love in the Time of Influenza: Hemingway and the 1918 Pandemic” by Susan F. Beegel.
“In 1918 a virulent strain of influenza emerged that would spread around the world, fueled by World War I with its patriotic rallies and parades, its streams of refugees, and its mass movements of troops, such as the [...]

 


Bulletin of the History of Medicine reviews Diploma Mill by David Alan Johnson

| Filed under: News

Toby A. Appel reviews Diploma Mill: The Rise and Fall of Dr. John Buchanan and the Eclectic Medical College of Pennsylvania for the Bulletin of the History of Medicine.
“Buchanan ran a large business, selling diplomas to individuals with or without any formal medical training in the United States and Europe. Buchanan’s two schools were not the [...]

 


Kevin Caprice reviews War, Memory, and the 1913 Gettysburg Reunion for H-CivWar

| Filed under: News

Don’t miss this excellent review of War, Memory, and the 1913 Gettysburg Reunion by Thomas R. Flagel. Reviewed by Keven Caprice for H-CivWar.
“With this work, Flagel has added a new level of insight to the field of Civil War memory, and his microhistorical approach to the personal nature of memory is a welcome addition. His focus on [...]

 


The House That Rock Built

and | Filed under: Books, Forthcoming, Music, Regional Interest
The House That Rock Built by Nite and Feran. Kent State University Press

For twenty-five years, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame has defined Cleveland’s image as the “Rock and Roll Capital of the World.” But while the Rock Hall has become an iconic landmark for the city of Cleveland and for fans of rock and roll around the world, it was just one missed phone call away from never being built in Cleveland. If the prominent singer and actress Leslie Gore hadn’t contacted radio personality Norm N. Nite in August 1983, the Hall of Fame would not be in Cleveland—period.

 


At the Forefront of Lee’s Invasion wins Gettysburg Civil War Roundtable award for 2018′s best book on Gettysburg Campaign

| Filed under: News

PRESS RELEASE
FROM:   Gettysburg Civil War Roundtable
RE:  Annual Distinguished Book Award
The Gettysburg Civil War Roundtable is pleased to announce that its annual award for the best book published on the Gettysburg Campaign in 2018  goes to Robert J. Wynstra for his work  At the Forefront of Lee’s Invasion: Retribution, Plunder, and Clashing Cultures on Richard S. [...]

 


Moments of Truth author Howard Ruffner interviewed on Live on Lakeside

| Filed under: News

 
Don’t miss this informative television interview of Howard Ruffner speaking about his new book Moments of Truth: A Photographer’s Experience of Kent State 1970. The interview aired September 18 on WKYC-TV3′s Live on Lakeside.
Find out more about Moments of Truth.

 


Emerging Civil War reviews Crossing the Deadlines: Civil War Prisons Reconsidered

| Filed under: News

Emerging Civil War reviews Crossing the Deadlines: Civil War Prisons Reconsidered edited by Michael P. Gray.
“This outstanding volume is a great read and engaging exploration of a field of Civil War study too often neglected.”—Emerging Civil War
Read more…
Get the book.

 


From Garfield to Harding

| Filed under: Recent Releases, U.S. History
Bourdon-hr

In 1880, James Garfield decided to try something new: rather than run the typical passive campaign for president, he would welcome voters to his farm. By the end of the campaign, thousands of people—including naturalized voters, African Americans, women, men from various occupations, and young voters—traveled to Garfield’s home, listened to him speak, shook hands, met his family, and were invited inside. The press reported the interactions across the country. Not only did Garfield win, but he started a new campaign technique that then carried three other Republicans to the presidency.

 


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