Shopping cart
Search alphabetically (by title):
  1. ALL
  2. #
  3. 0
  4. 1
  5. 2
  6. 3
  7. 4
  8. 5
  9. 6
  10. 7
  11. 8
  12. 9
  13. A
  14. B
  15. C
  16. D
  17. E
  18. F
  19. G
  20. H
  21. I
  22. J
  23. K
  24. L
  25. M
  26. N
  27. O
  28. P
  29. Q
  30. R
  31. S
  32. T
  33. U
  34. V
  35. W
  36. X
  37. Y
  38. Z

Books

Medical Histories of Union Generals

| Filed under: Civil War Era
Welsh Book Cover

During the Civil War, the majority of the 583 Union generals studied here were afflicted by disease, injured by accidents, or suffered wounds. Following the war, they often suffered lingering diseases and the effects of unhealed wounds. Medical Histories of Union Generals includes a glossary of medical terms as well as a sequence of medical events during the Civil War listing wounds, accidents, and deaths. With his earlier book on Confederate generals, Dr. Welsh has produced a “must have” reference for medical and military historians.

 


Meet Me at Ray’s

| Filed under: Black Squirrel Books, Regional Interest
O'Connor-hr

Meet Me at Ray’s celebrates more than seventy-five successful years (and counting) of Ray’s Place, a restaurant and bar located near the Kent State University campus in Kent, Ohio. Once referred to as the place “where the hustlers meet to hustle the hustlers,” Ray’s Place has survived decades of trends, changes, and events. Hundreds of students have worked there, thousands of customers have dined there, and millions of glasses have been raised there.

 


Meet Me on Lake Erie, Dearie!

| Filed under: Cleveland Theater, Regional Interest
Vacha4-hr

In the summers of 1936 and 1937 the Great Lakes Exposition was presented in Cleveland, Ohio, along the Lake Erie shore just north of the downtown business area. At the time, Cleveland was America’s sixth largest city. The Exposition was scheduled to commemorate the centennial of Cleveland’s incorporation and was conceived as a way to energize a city hit hard by the Great Depression. In its first summer the Exposition drew four million visitors and three million more during its second and final season.

 


The Melodic Tradition of Ireland

| Filed under: Music, World Musics
Cowdery Book Cover

This is a major work, at once synthetic and analytical. The author has drawn on previous studies of Irish music and general melodic theory to describe the inner workings of a rich melodic tradition. Irish folk music, resting upon monophonic melodies which are varied and ornamented, and thus viewed from several perspectives—ethnographic and musical, “insider” and theoretical—to weave an integrated image of a still thriving genre. The concepts of “tune family” and “melody type” are starting points for the qualitative study of melodic change and tune relationships without recourse to simplified tune skeletons or statistics. The concept of “implicit” folk theory leads both to rigorous theoretical analysis and to an examination of the musicians’ own words, thus creating a working model in which a particular performance is understood in a larger context.

 


Melville “Among the Nations”

| Filed under: Literature & Literary Criticism
Marovitz Book Cover

Scholars from around the world met in Volos, Greece, to discuss the work of American writer and international traveler Herman Melville. The papers presented at this conference reflected a variety of interdisciplinary, international, and intergenerational perspectives. With the participation of esteemed Melville studies, this unique conference afforded all who attended an overview of current approaches to Melville and detailed thematic examinations of his specific works and themes.

 


Melville and the Visual Arts

| Filed under: Literature & Literary Criticism
Melville Book Cover

Throughout his professional life, Herman Melville displayed a keen interest in the visual arts. He alluded to works of art to embellish his poems and novels and made substantial use of the technique of ekphrasis, the literary description of works of visual arts, to give body to plot and character. In carefully tracing Melville’s use of the art analogy as a literary technique, Douglas Robillard shows how Melville evolved as a writer.

 


Melville and Women

and | Filed under: Literature & Literary Criticism
Schultz Book Cover

The twelve new essays in this collection extend the interest in Melville and women evident in recent scholarship, biography, art, and drama. Throughout his life, Melville lived surrounded by women, and he wove women’s experiences into most of his literary work, early and late. Treating his poetry and prose and using a variety of theoretical approaches from the biographical to the ecocritical, the essays focus not only on Melville’s female characters but also on gender roles, colonialism, intertextuality, legal issues, and concepts of the female and feminine. Several of them demonstrate his sensitive response to the work of nineteenth-century women authors. Collectively, they open new understandings of a writer too often seen almost wholly in masculine contexts.

 


Melville as Poet

| Filed under: Literature & Literary Criticism
Marovitz cover

Herman Melville’s literary reputation is based chiefly on his fiction, especially Moby-Dick and Billy Budd. Yet he was a gifted poet, as evidenced by his collection of Civil War poems, Battle-Pieces and Aspects of the War (1866), and by his epic-length poem, Clarel (1876), a symbolic rendering of his pilgrimage of 1856–57 to the Holy Land, as well as the two small volumes of poems he published before his death in 1891.

 


Melville’s Clarel and the Intersympathy of Creeds

| Filed under: Literature & Literary Criticism
Potter Book Cover

In Melville’s Clarel and the Intersympathy of Creeds, Potter examines the poem within a historical context and by so doing attempts to resolve some of the issues critics have asserted the poem presents. He reviews the burgeoning field of comparative religion in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and includes discussions of many of the theories and ideas of well-known figures of the time, such as Hegel, Hume, Müller, Emerson, Whitman, and Schopenhauer. Potter attempts to account for the huge abundance of non-Christian material that appears in the poem. He maintains that Melville answers the nineteenth-century questions of faith through the heterodoxical themes and ideas shared by all religions that lie beneath their very different doctrines—redemptive suffering, the tempered heart, and the aversion to worldliness.

 


Melville’s Folk Roots

| Filed under: Literature & Literary Criticism
Hayes Book Cover

Herman Melville’s reputation as a great writer has gradually evolved throughout the past century. Tempered by studies that emphasize the Western literary tradition, literary appreciation for Melville’s use of folklore has been slow in developing. This ground-breaking study brings to the forefront the depth of Melville’s immersion with and borrowing from oral traditions. Though intended as a survey of Melville’s use of folklore, this book serves also as a general introduction to his work. Unencumbered by critical jargon and narrated in an engaging manner, this book will appeal to general readers as well as seasoned scholars of Melville.