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Books

The Passion of Meter

| Filed under: Literature & Literary Criticism
Meter Book Cover

The Passion of Meter is the first extended critical study of Wordsworth’s metrical theory and his practice in the art of versification. Until now, relatively little attention has been paid to the relationship between Wordsworth’s attempt to incorporate into his poetry the language of “common life” and the highly complex and decidedly conventional metrical forms in which he presents this language. O’Donnell provides a detailed treatment of what Wordsworth calls the “innumerable minutiae” that the art of the poet depends upon and of the broader vision to which those minutiae contribute. Beginning with a reassessment of Wordsworth’s frequently misrepresented prose comments about meter, O’Donnell argues that these comments-considered in light of Wordsworth’s practice and within their 18th-century context are more unorthodox and challenging than previously thought. In emphasizing the physical body of the poem as the site of a dynamic tension between conflicting passions – “the passion of sense” and “the passion of meter.”

 


The Pattern in the Web

| Filed under: Literature & Literary Criticism
Web Book Cover

Charles Williams has achieved considerable reputation for his novels. He has been recognized as a brilliant theologian and a sensitive literary critic. But Williams himself wished most to be remembered as a poet, and trusted his future literary reputation to the two-volume series of poems on the Arthurian theme, Taliessin Through Logres and The Region of the Summer Stars. The emphasis in this study is on the quality of these poems as poetry and only secondarily upon their religious content. Although essentially Christian, they are placed within the context of the multifaceted, many-changing forms of recurring myths. Thus they represent one of the few attempts in the twentieth century to encapsulate and age-old and ever-recurring “pattern in the web” in a brilliant structure that is thoroughly modern.

 


Pattern of Circles

| Filed under: Autobiography & Memoirs, Diplomatic Studies, European & World History
Dolibois Book Cover

Pattern of Circles is a success story, for its author and his country. John E. Dolibois was born December 4, 1918, in Luxembourg. His mother died weeks later, and he was raised by an older sister until she left for Akron, Ohio, with her American husband. In 1931 John came to Akron with his father and thus began a fascinating life journey.

 


Peace and Persistence

| Filed under: Religion
Heisey Book Cover

In the first half of the 20th century, American society mobilized for the three great wars: World War I, World War II, and the Cold War. During this tumultuous period the Brethren in Christ joined other pacifists in opposing participation in the mobilizations. Like the Amish, Mennonites, and Church of the Brethren—other groups descended from sixteenth-century European Anabaptists—the Brethren in Christ held nonresistant pacifism as a fundamental aspect of their identity. They carried out their peace witness, however, not as an isolated community but as one integrated economically, technologically, and culturally into American society.

 


The Peace Corps in Cameroon

| Filed under: Diplomatic Studies
Amin Book Cover

The Peace Corps in Cameroon also contains a comparative analysis of the agency’s work in the neighboring countries of Ghana and Guinea, where its efforts were not as successful. In addition, it features numerous photographs of volunteers at work in Cameroon and maps to complement the text. This pioneer study contributes to Africanist/American scholarship in general, and specifically adds to the historical literature about Peace Corps volunteers in a Third World country. It is must reading for anyone interested in similar endeavors in African countries or in the overall effectiveness of the Peace Corps program.

 


Pen of Fire

| Filed under: Civil War Era
Bridges Book Cover

This fascinating first biography of Daniel incorporates much new research, including correspondence between foreign ministers in Turin and their envoys in Washington and a series of private letters between John Daniel and his great uncle Peter Vivian Daniel of the U.S. Supreme Court, U.S. Secretary of War John Floyd, and others. Pen of Fire fills a gap in general American historiography, in published works dealing with nineteenth-century American diplomacy, and in studies of the Civil War.

 


Penitentiaries, Punishment, and Military Prisons

| Filed under: Award Winners, Civil War Era, Justice Studies, Recent Releases, U.S. History, Understanding Civil War History
Penitentiaries, Punishment, and Military Prisons by Angela M. Zombek. Kent State University Press

Penitentiaries, Punishment, and Military Prisons confronts the enduring claim that Civil War military prisons represented an apocalyptic and ahistorical rupture in America’s otherwise linear and progressive carceral history. Instead, it places the war years in the broader context of imprisonment in 19th-century America and contends that officers in charge of military prisons drew on administrative and punitive practices that existed in antebellum and wartime civilian penitentiaries to manage the war’s crisis of imprisonment. Union and Confederate officials outlined rules for military prisons, instituted punishments, implemented prison labor, and organized prisoners of war, both civilian and military, in much the same way as peacetime penitentiary officials had done, leading journalists to refer to many military prisons as “penitentiaries.”

 


Phantoms of the South Fork

| Filed under: Civil War Era, Civil War Soldiers and Strategies, History, Military History, U.S. History, Understanding Civil War History
French cover

At 3 a.m. on February 21, 1865, a band of 65 Confederate horsemen slowly made its way down Greene Street in Cumberland, Maryland. Thinking the riders were disguised Union scouts, the few Union soldiers out that bitterly cold morning paid little attention to them. In the meantime, over 3,500 Yankee soldiers peacefully slept.

 


The Philadelphia Phillies

and | Filed under: eBook Sale 20, Sports, Writing Sports
Philadelphia Book Cover

In addition to its comprehensive and intimate examination of the team’s history, The Philadelphia Phillies addresses the challenge of rooting for an often-struggling home team in a city known for its passionate baseball fans. Lieb’s devotion to his hometown Phillies and overall love of the game and Baumgartner’s unique insight as a Philadelphia sportswriter and former player often lead to thoughtful advice and comfort for long-suffering Phillies fans. A trip through a rocky but remarkable past, The Philadelphia Phillies is another enjoyable addition to the Writing Sports Series.

 


A Photo Album of Ohio’s Canal Era, 1825-1913

| Filed under: Regional Interest
Gieck Book Cover

This book s a profusely illustrated interpretation of life along Ohio’s nineteenth-century canal system: the Miami & Erie Canal in the western part of the state, and the Ohio & Erie Canal with its multiple feeders in central and eastern Ohio. An introduction by George W. Knepper, professor of history at The University of Akron and president of The Ohio Historical Society, places the state’s canal system in national historic perspective and addresses such issues as the importance of the Ohio canal system in the state’s economy and industrial development; the interrelationship between the Industrial Revolution in Ohio and the changing uses of canals; and the impact of the canal system on contemporary social and ethnic issues.