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Books

The Way of the Pipa

| Filed under: Music, World Musics
Pipa Book Cover

“Over the centuries a repertoire of solo pipa pieces has developed and this study focuses on those found in the Hua collection, which encompasses the pieces in the repertoire of the Hua family, and was printed, using the wooden block technique, in 1819.  Among the works are many ancient melodies which were handed down through [...]

 


“We Can Do Together”

| Filed under: Regional Interest
Celeste Book Cover

“We Can Do Together” is a deeply personal account of a woman who wrote through grief and bitterness to find peace and a renewed appreciation for life and its beauty. “There are many sides to every story,” as writer and friend Alicia Miller says. “This is Dagmar’s, and it is told with a fierce intensity and unwavering candor that is moving and inspiring.”

 


We Fight for Peace

| Filed under: Audiobooks, History, Military History
McKnight cover

At midnight on January 24, 1954, the last step was taken in the armistice to end the war in Korea. That night, the neutral Indian guards who had overseen the prisoner of war repatriation process abandoned their posts, leaving their charges to make their own decisions. The vast majority of men allowed to choose a new nation were Chinese and North Koreans who elected the path of freedom. There were smaller groups hoping that the communist bloc would give them a better life; among these men were twenty-one American soldiers and prisoners of war. “We Fight for Peace” tells their story.

 


“We Have It Damn Hard Out Here”

| Filed under: Civil War Era
Wittenberg Book Cover

Told in his own words, this is the story of Sgt. Thomas W. Smith’s service in the Civil War—the greatest adventure of his life. It is also the story of his regiment, the 6th Pennsylvania Cavalry, known as Rush’s Lancers, named both for the distinctive wooden lances they carried for the first two years of the war and for their first commanding officer, Col. Richard H. Rush. These letters provide rare insight into the workings and daily life of a noncommissioned officer. They are filled with humor and humanity and demonstrate the hardships withstood by the common soldier of the Civil War. The added narrative and annotations assist the reader in identifying the persons and events described and in placing them in the proper historical perspective and context.

 


We Wear the Mask

| Filed under: African American Studies, Discover Black History, Literature & Literary Criticism
Harrell Book Cover

Willie Harrell has assembled a collection of essays on Dunbar’s work that builds on the research published over the last two decades. Employing an array of approaches to Dunbar’s poetic creations, these essays closely examine the self-motivated and dynamic effect of his use of dialect, language, rhetorical strategies, and narrative theory to promote racial uplift. They situate Dunbar’s work in relation to the issues of advancement popular during the Reconstruction era and against the racial stereotypes proliferating in the early twentieth century while demonstrating its relevance to contemporary literary studies.

 


We Were the Ninth

| Filed under: Civil War Era, Military History
Grebner Book Cover

We Were The Ninth is a translation, carefully edited and thoroughly annotated, of an important Civil War regiment. The Ninth Ohio—composed of Ohio Germans mostly from Cincinnati—saw action at Rich Mountain and Carnifex Ferry in West Virginia, Shiloh, Corinth, Perryville, Hoover’s Gap, Nashville, Chattanooga, and Chickamauga.

 


Wearable Prints, 1760–1860

| Filed under: Award Winners, Clothing & Costume, History
Greene Cover

Wearable prints are not only a decorative art form but also the product of a range of complex industrial processes and an eco- nomically important commodity. But when did textile printing originate, and how can we identify the fabrics, inks, dyes, and printing processes used on surviving historical examples?