Shopping cart
Search alphabetically (by title):
  1. ALL
  2. #
  3. 0
  4. 1
  5. 2
  6. 3
  7. 4
  8. 5
  9. 6
  10. 7
  11. 8
  12. 9
  13. A
  14. B
  15. C
  16. D
  17. E
  18. F
  19. G
  20. H
  21. I
  22. J
  23. K
  24. L
  25. M
  26. N
  27. O
  28. P
  29. Q
  30. R
  31. S
  32. T
  33. U
  34. V
  35. W
  36. X
  37. Y
  38. Z

Books

In Those Days

| Filed under: Autobiography & Memoirs, Diplomatic Studies
Spain Book Cover

In Those Days is the candid, often funny, autobiography of a twentieth-century American diplomat who spent most of his life in high-level diplomacy in Asia and Africa. The story takes James Spain form an Irish Catholic childhood in gangster-era Chicago through military service as Douglas MacArthur’s photographer in occupied Japan and university life at Chicago and a Ph.D. from Columbia. His Foreign Service career brought postings in Islamabad, Istanbul, and Ankara and four ambassadorships—in Tanzania, Turkey, the United Nations (as deputy permanent representative), and Sri Lanka.

 


The Indispensable Harp

| Filed under: Art, World Musics
Schechter Book Cover

A musical instrument that has played a vital role in Latin American music cultures—the harp—is the subject of this new work, the first study of its kind to be published in English. John Schechter presents a history of the harp in Spain, traces its introduction into colonial Latin America, and describes its modern roles in the diverse cultural centers of Mexico, Paraguay-Argentina-chile, Venezuela, and Peru. He then turns his focus to his own field research in the Quichua culture of northern highland Ecuador, an area that has receive considerably less scholarly attention than many of its Latin American neighbors. The reader will meet a community of harp maistrus on the slopes of Mt. Cotacachi and become familiar with their culture, their particular instrument and its tuning, and their performance practices. Numerous photographs, musical transcriptions, and diagrams illustrate and enliven the text. The Indispensable Harp is unique for its integration of aspects of music and cultural history, organology, and performance practice, treating in considerable depth both broadly established music-ethnographical practices. It speaks to the conclusion that the vital role of the harp in Latin American music history has now been properly acknowledged and documented.

 


The Infirmary

| Filed under: Poetry, Wick First Book
Infirmary Book Cover

“Edward Micus won’t write the kind of poem whose language leads only to charming confusions, whose music is machine-pressed, a tin ornament. His poems instead speak directly, and their quiet, searing imagery burns down the fence between visible and invisible world. That music you hear—it’s the rhythm of affection, for places, lovers, friends. It’s the rhythm of the blood ‘taking in what it can, making its laps, / leading us on.’” —Richard Robbins

 


The Inklings Coloring Book

| Filed under: Black Squirrel Books, Science Fiction and Fantasy, Tolkien, Lewis, and Inkling Studies
Owen cover

Renowned fantasy illustrator James A. Owen presents fifteen intricate and imaginative line drawings inspired by the works of Oxford’s famous Inklings and Diana Glyer’s fascinating Bandersnatch.

Printed on heavy stock on one side only, each drawing is suitable for markers, fine-tipped pens, and colored pencils. Color your way through The Eagle and Child pub, along the banks of the Isis, beneath the spires of Magdalene College—and find (and color!) the bandersnatch hidden in each picture.

 


The Insanity Defense and the Mad Murderess of Shaker Heights

| Filed under: Audiobooks, Award Winners, History, Recent Releases, Regional Interest, True Crime, True Crime History
The Insanity Defense and the Mad Murderess of Shaker Heights by William L. Tabac. Kent State University Press

They have no witnesses. They have no case. With this blunt observation, Mariann Colby—an attractive, church-going Shaker Heights, Ohio, mother and housewife—bet a defense psychiatrist that she would not be convicted of murder. A lack of witnesses was not the only problem that would confront the State of Ohio in 1966, which would seek to prosecute her for shooting to death Cremer Young Jr., her son’s nine-year-old playmate: Colby had deftly cleaned up after herself by hiding the child’s body miles from her home and concealing the weapon.

 


Inscribing My Name

| Filed under: Discover Black History, Poetry
Inscribing Book Cover

Martin’s poetry captures life in the Midwest through the authenticity of his voice, his dramatic sense, and the wonderful innovation of his multidisciplinary talents (poet, scholar, teacher, librettist, and performer). From his first volume of poetry in 1969 to Inscribing My Name, Martin’s work brings alive important issues and struggles in our understanding of what it means to be human. This accomplished body of work is a unique combination of traditional poetic forms, the African American musical tradition, and Martin’s extensive experience creating and performing theater and opera.

 


Inside Looking Out

| Filed under: History, Regional Interest, Religion
Polster-mr

The Cleveland Jewish Orphan Asylum was for fifty years (1868-1918) the home for some 3,500 boys and girls, most of them immigrants from Eastern Europe. Gary Polster’s study examines the efforts of the more acculturated German Jews of Cleveland to “Americanize” and make good workers of the newcomers, and to teach a Judaism quite removed from the Yiddish culture and religious orthodoxy of Eastern Europe. The dominant figure at the asylum during the formative years was Samuel Wofenstein (1841-1921), a native of Moravia who by the age of 22 had earned both a rabbinical degree and a Ph.D in philosophy.

 


Intaglio

| Filed under: Poetry, Wick First Book
Intaglio Book Cover

“The image evoked by Intaglio, this first collection by Ariana-Sophia Kartsonis, rests on a paradox, one perhaps central to the poetic impulse itself: that design can be shaped by what is cut away, by the loss that surrounds it, so that what is missing creates the negative space which raises the figure in relief, presents it to sight, and touch. Relief: a word whose two meanings—one artistic and material, the other emotional and intangible, together suggest how art engraves meaning.” —Eleanor Wilner, Judge

 


Intended Place

| Filed under: Poetry, Wick First Book
Willey Book Cover

“Many of the poems in Rosemary Willey’s Intended Place are flawless meditations on possibility and denial. The voice in these poems is straightforward, and there isn’t an emotional placebo behind the terse syntax and the believable imagery… From the very first few pages, we realize that this voice embodies empathy and a to-the-point inquiry. Rosemary Willey cannot keep her mind off the real things of this world, touching life where it feels good and where it pains, always snapping the chanced wishbone, and we are more blessed and richer for her daring talent.”—Yusef Komunyakaa, Judge

 


Interpreting American History: Reconstruction

| Filed under: Discover Black History, Interpreting American History, U.S. History, Understanding Civil War History
Smith cover

Writing in 1935 in his brilliant and brooding Black Reconstruction, W. E. B. Du Bois lamented America’s post–Civil War era as a missed opportunity to reconstruct the war-torn nation in deed as well as in word. “If the Reconstruction of the Southern states, from slavery to free labor, and from aristocracy to industrial democracy, had been conceived as a major national program of America, whose accomplishment at any price was well worth the effort,” wrote Du Bois, “we should be living today in a different world.”