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Teaching Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises

| Filed under: Hemingway Studies, Literature & Literary Criticism, Teaching Hemingway
Hays Book Cover

Professor Peter L. Hays, an experienced teacher who has taught The Sun Also Rises for more than forty years, has gathered together other seasoned instructors who teach Ernest Hemingway’s rich and complex novel. An informative collection of approaches to the presentation of The Sun Also Rises, this volume provides historic background and a glossary of arcane references, presents critical interpretations, and offers methodologies to inspire teachers of college and high school students.

 


Ten Months in the “Orphan Brigade”

| Filed under: Civil War Era
Orphan Book Cover

Chapman’s memoir, written from memory in 1867 and aided in part by his extensive correspondence with his family, alternately sparkles with humor and wit and bristles with a passionate hatred for Yankees. He recalled his soldiering days with nostalgia, for he suspected those months in the army might have been the high point of his life.

 


Tenderly Lift Me

| Filed under: Explore Women's History, Literature & Medicine, Medicine, Poetry
Bryner Book Cover

Those who teach the literature of medicine have questioned why there is a lack of rich materials that connects nursing and the humanities. Author and poet Jeanne Bryner has gathered biographical sketches of remarkable nurses, each accompanied by poetry and photographs, and has created the multigenre presentation that is the compassionate and complex Tenderly Lift Me. This is the first book in the Literature and Medicine Series that concentrates on nurses’ voices and their experiences with providing health care. It enhances and extends perspectives on how health care is understood and delivered by recognizing nurses as the primary care givers.

 


Terrorism for Self-Glorification

| Filed under: Audiobooks, True Crime, True Crime History
Terrorism Book Cover

The study of terrorism requires interdisciplinary inquiry. Proving that terrorism cannot be the exclusive focus of a single field of scholarship, Borowitz presents this complex subject using sources based in religion, philosophy, history, Greek mythology, and world literature, including works of Chaucer, Cervantes, Mark Twain, and Jean-Paul Sartre. Terrorism for Self-Glorification, written in clear and direct prose, is original, thorough, and thought provoking. Scholars, specialists, and general readers will find their understanding of terrorism greatly enhanced by this book.

 


Tethering World

| Filed under: Poetry, Wick Chapbook

“Jody Rambo’s first book of poetry, Tethering World, is lyrical, tactile, and transcendent—in a word, enthralling. The very texture embodies a personal way of seeing and saying, as does the extraordinary range of circumstances. There is a beguiling strangeness to the writing, and philosophical smarts to boot. ‘I am weatherly,’ says the speaker in Tethering World, and she truly is, singularly so. This book is poetry top to bottom.” —Marvin Bell

 


This We Know

, and | Filed under: History, May 4 Resources, Regional Interest

This We Know succinctly documents the facts that fill out the chronology of events of the four fateful days that ended with members of the Ohio National Guard killing Kent State students Sandra Scheuer, Jeffrey Miller, Allison Krause, and William Schroeder and wounding nine others. It gathers well-established information from recorded accounts, from the time events happened through what has been learned since.

 


Though Murder Has No Tongue

| Filed under: Regional Interest, True Crime, True Crime History
Badal book cover

Though Murder Has No Tongue tells the story of Frank Dolezal, the only man actually arrested and charged with the infamous “Torso Murders” in Cleveland, Ohio, during the late 1930s. Dolezal, a fifty-two-year-old Slav immigrant, came to the attention of sheriff ’s investigators because of his reputation as a strange man who possessed a stockpile of butcher knives. According to rumors, he threatened imagined transgressors and had a penchant for frequenting bars in the seedy neighborhood where the dismembered bodies of victims had been discovered. Dolezal was arrested in July 1939 and never saw freedom again.

 


Three Days at Gettysburg

| Filed under: Civil War Era
Three Book Cover

Three Days at Gettysburg contains essays from noted Civil War historians on leadership during the battle. The contributors to this volume believe there is room for scholarship that revisits the sources on which earlier accounts have been based and challenges prevailing interpretations of key officers’ performances. They have trained their investigative lens on some obvious and some relatively neglected figures, with an eye toward illuminating not only what happened at Gettysburg but also the nature of command at different levels.

 


Through the Lens of Allen E. Cole

and | Filed under: Discover Black History, History, Photography, Regional Interest
Through the Lens of Allen E. Cole by Black & Williams. Kent State University Press

During the Great Depression, photographer Allen Eugene Cole posted a sign in front of his studio in Cleveland’s Central neighborhood: Somebody, Somewhere, Wants Your Photograph. An entrepreneurial businessman with a keen ability to market his images of Cleveland’s black experience, Cole was deeply immersed in civic life.

 


Thunder in the Heartland

and | Filed under: Regional Interest
Schmidlin Book Cover

Ohio can be a land of weather extremes. There are droughts followed by flood, arctic cold and soaring heat in one year, a Christmas warmed to 70 degrees and a Christmas white with thirty inches of snow. Ice jams on the Sandusky River and tornadoes across its southern counties, wind storms in Cleveland and floods in the Ohio River Valley inspire Ohioans to “remember when.” Thomas and Jeanne Schmidlin, native Ohioans, have brought together data from government records, scientific studies, memoirs, diaries, and newspapers in the first comprehensive book on Ohio weather. They highlight 200 weather events from 1790 to the present—extremes of rain, snow, storms, and temperature. Anecdotal, often first person, accounts are enhanced by statistics, photographs, and maps. They describe the place of weather in popular history and folklore and how forces of nature compelled the construction of extensive flood control and weather warning systems in Ohio. Thunder in the Heartland will be of interest to climatologist, cultural historians, and all who live the weather of the Oho Country.